News

  • Wright House Outbid on a Piece of Its History

    A Frank Lloyd Wright lamp designed in 1903 for the Dana-Thomas House in Springfield, Illinois, was sold at auction Tuesday at Christie's for a record-breaking two million dollars, writes Linda Hales in the Washington Post. One of the bidders was a civic-minded “friend” of the house whose goal was to send the fixture home, but it was not to be.

    Read more
  • Dia's New Center and Ten Public Projects

    In May, the Dia Center for the Arts plans to open a new twenty-million-dollar museum in an abandoned paper factory in Beacon, New York, on the Hudson River, writes Carol Vogel in the New York Times. The surrounding area will host public-art projects, as Minetta Brook, a nonprofit organization that presents public-art projects around New York State, has asked Lothar Baumgarten, Matthew Buckingham, Constance De Jong, Peter Hutton, Matts Leiderstam, Christian Philipp Müller, Lynne Tillman, George Trakas, James Welling, and Pae White to create new work in sites around the region.

    Read more
  • Egyptian Museum Celebrates Centenary

    The Egyptian Museum in Cairo celebrates a century of existence with a four-day festival honoring leading Egyptologists and during which 250 artifacts will be exhibited for the first time, writes Acil Tabbara in Middle East Online.

    Read more
  • Condé Nast and “Unauthorized Usage”

    Condé Nast, the publishing conglomerate whose titles include Vogue, House & Garden, Vanity Fair, and, since March, Tate's magazine, Tate, has blocked the display of work by British artist Graham Dolphin at the Barbican Centre in London, writes Cristina Ruiz in the Art Newspaper. The work in question consists of manipulated and vandalized magazine covers.

    Read more
  • Allan Frumkin, Art Dealer, Dies at Seventy-five

    Allan Frumkin, a distinguished dealer in European and American modern art who had galleries in New York and Chicago for more than forty years, died Monday at a Manhattan hospital, writes Roberta Smith in the New York Times. He was seventy-five.

    Read more
  • Benefactors' Mutiny at Art Gallery of Ontario

    This summer, after much soul-searching and wrangling with their museum's bureaucracy, the Junior Associates of the Art Gallery of Ontario withdrew from the AGO en masse to start their own organization, Partners in Art, writes Sarah Milroy in the Toronto Globe and Mail. They wanted to run their events their way, they say, and designate their earnings for a specific area: the acquisition of contemporary art.

    Read more
  • Fort Worth's Collection Grows to Fit Its Frame

    In the nearly seven years that the Museum of Modern Art of Fort Worth expansion has been under way, with director Marla Price at the helm, the museum's collection of painting, sculpture, and other postwar art has also been transformed, writes Christopher Knight in the Los Angeles Times. Sources report that between forty and sixty million dollars were spent on additions to the collection—a figure that approaches the sixty-million-dollar cost of the new building.

    Read more
  • Two Museums Expand, in Spite of It All

    Two new museum buildings, with a combined construction cost of nearly one hundred million dollars, are in the works for Manhattan, despite a tight economy that has forced cutbacks at other cultural organizations, writes Robin Pogrebin in the New York Times. The New Museum of Contemporary Art is planning to build a new thirty-five-million-dollar, sixty-thousand-square-foot home along a motley stretch of the Bowery, at Prince Street, by 2005, and the Rubin Museum of Art, devoted primarily to Himalayan and Tibetan painting, is currently being developed in Chelsea.

    Read more
  • New Art Prize for Canada

    Canada has established a biennial prize for young Canadian artists, writes Shawna Richer in the Toronto Globe and Mail. A winner takes home fifty thousand dollars, and the runner-up takes home fifteen thousand. The host institution—the prize will be run by a different one each time—also receives ten thousand dollars to purchase contemporary art for its collection.

    Read more
  • Van Gogh Thieves' Minimal Approach

    A pair of thieves equipped with just a ladder, a large piece of cloth, and a rope managed to break into Amsterdam's famous Van Gogh museum over the weekend and make off with two multimillion-pound canvases, write Andrew Osborn and Vanessa Thorpe in The Guardian. The stolen pictures were among the most carefully guarded and valuable works of art in the world.

    Read more
  • Museums Take Stand Against Return of Artifacts

    Some of the world's leading museums have joined forces to declare that they will not hand back ancient artifacts to their countries of origin, reports the BBC News. Directors of eighteen institutions from Saint Petersburg to New York signed a declaration saying their collections act as “universal museums” for the good of the world.

    Read more
  • Victorian Paintings Drop in Value

    For much of the twentieth century, Victorian art was mocked for its sentimentality, but in the 1990s a market was created for these once-unfashionable paintings, writes Will Bennett in The Telegraph. Last week, however, Victorian pictures at auction at both Christie's and Sotheby's did not sell well.

    Read more