News

  • Yoko Ono Funds and Bestows Award For Peace

    On Wednesday at the United Nations in Geneva, Yoko Ono inaugurated her own peace award, giving fifty thousand dollars to artists Zvi Goldstein (an Israeli) and Khalil Rabah (a Palestinian), reports the BBC News.

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  • Even In Canada, Funding Drops For Arts

    Toronto's financial support of its major cultural institutions has declined by 35 percent in the past decade, at the same time that the regional economy has grown by 40 percent, James Adams writes in the Toronto Globe and Mail.

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  • Supreme Court Hears Arguments on Copyrights for Arts

    This week, the justices of the Supreme Court heard a much-anticipated oral argument on a novel constitutional issue, writes Charles Lane in the Washington Post. For how long may Congress extend copyrights on literature, art, music, and film?

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  • Turner Descendants Fight to Reclaim Paintings

    Descendants of J.M.W. Turner are threatening to take back hundreds of his paintings, claiming that the Tate and the National Gallery are not honoring the terms of his will, writes Nilufer Atik in the Evening Standard.

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  • Statue of Adam Shatters at New York's Met

    A fifteenth-century marble statue of Adam by Venetian sculptor Tullio Lombardo crashed to the ground at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, scattering its arms, its legs, and an ornamental tree trunk into dozens of pieces, writes Celestine Bohlen in the New York Times.

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  • Scottish Museum Scores Some Beuys

    The Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art has purchased a collection of Joseph Beuys's drawings, lithographs, photographs, books, and sculptures— amounting to a third of all multiples produced by the artist—for approximately 950,000 dollars, writes Fiachra Gibbons in The Guardian.

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  • When Faith Moves Murals

    After spending seventy years sequestered on private property, David Alfaro Siquieros's 1932 mural Mexico Today is now on public view at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, writes Susan Emerling in the Los Angeles Times. Nearly four years and a million dollars were dedicated to its acquisition, transportation, restoration, and reinstallation.

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  • Controversial Decision at the Royal Academy

    Before an exhibition opening at London's Royal Academy, anti-American slogans that made up part of an artwork were painted over, allegedly for fear of alienating a US sponsor, writes Louisa Buck in the Art Newspaper.

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  • Treasures of Catholic Church Find Their Way Uptown

    Among the works in New York as part of a traveling exhibit organized by the Roman Catholic Church of Spain are a painting of Saint Sebastian by El Greco from a cathedral in Palencia and an unusual work by Goya from a convent in Valladolid, writes Celestine Bohlen in the New York Times. The works are on view at the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine.

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