News

  • Tax Relief Gives UK Museums Cause for Celebration

    Cash-strapped museums in the UK were celebrating Wednesday night after the chancellor appeared to indicate that he would extend tax relief to works of art given to major institutions, Fiachra Gibbons reports in The Guardian. With minuscule budgets to buy new work, British museums and galleries have relied on public appeals to keep important artworks in the country.

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  • Art Director Samuel N. Antupit is Dead at 71

    Samuel N. Antupit, art director for more than one hundred magazines and newspapers and the designer of books by artists like Roy Lichtenstein, Alex Katz, and Barbara Kruger, died on Saturday in Seattle, Steven Heller writes in the New York Times. He was seventy-one.

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  • A New Addition to Art in Florida

    Well-heeled residents of Palm Beach are pouring millions of dollars' worth of art and cash into a museum that until ten years ago was modest enough to be called a gallery but is now winning national acclaim. The donations allowed the Norton Museum of Art to unveil a twenty-million-dollar wing last month, Jill Barton writes in the Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

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  • Breton Auction Is Off to a Chaotic Start

    A crowd of more than four hundred people packed Paris's Drouot auction house when the first of 5,500 items collected by Andre Breton went under the hammer, Reuters reports. As bidding began, protesters flung stink bombs into the crowd, holding up the auction for several minutes.

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  • Leon Levy, Collector and Philanthropist, Dies at 77

    Leon Levy, the founder of the securities firm Oppenheimer & Co., died on April 6 at the age of seventy-seven, Robert Lenzner reports in Forbes. Levy was a noted collector and philanthropist who owned the finest collection of Roman and Greek antiquities in the US and had recently given funds for a new Roman wing to the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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  • Museum Concedes “Moral Case” for Chardin's Return

    The Burrell Collection, a museum in Glasgow that houses some of Scotland's most important art, has admitted that one of its paintings was taken from its rightful owners by the Nazis, and has agreed that two Jewish families have a “moral case” for demanding its return or financial compensation. The painting, Le Paté de Jambon, is attributed to Chardin, Phil Miller reports in the Glasgow Herald.

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  • Stolen Pompeii Frescoes Recovered

    Italian police have recovered two famous frescoes that were stolen last weekend from a house in the Roman city of Pompeii, near Naples, the BBC reports. The frescoes were found at a construction site close to the historic city, after roadblocks were set up across the whole of Naples province.

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  • Danish Architect Jorn Utzon Wins Pritzker Prize

    Jorn Utzon, the Danish-born modernist best known for his design of the much-celebrated Sydney Opera House, has won the 2003 Pritzker Prize, architecture's highest honor. Over the course of his career, Nicolai Ouroussoff writes in the Los Angeles Times, Utzon created a range of significant works whose bold abstract aesthetic was often tempered by a sensitivity to precedent.

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  • Richard York, Art Dealer, is Dead at Fifty-Two

    Manhattan art dealer Richard York died last week of cancer at the age of fifty-two, Newsday reports. York founded his eponymous gallery in 1981 and specialized in works of American art dating from the mid-eighteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries.

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  • Degas Gives Detroit Economy a Boost

    The Detroit Institute of Art’s exhibition of “Degas and the Dance” added an estimated fifteen million dollars to the metro Detroit economy, Robert Ankeny reports in Crain's Detroit Business. The show drew almost 172,000 viewers during its twelve weeks at the DIA.

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  • Arts and Entertainment Feel Wartime Pinch

    The news is bad throughout the arts and entertainment industry, with business down for book and record stores, museums, movie theaters, and Broadway shows, Hillel Italie reports in the Chicago Sun-Times. If the war has led some to seek escapist entertainment, others have decided to stay at home.

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  • Under New Director, Omaha Museum Aims High

    A year and a half into his tenure, J. Brooks Joyner, the director of Omaha's Joslyn Museum, is strengthening the museum's commitment to contemporary art. Joyner has hired New York–based writer and curator Klaus Kertess to advise on exhibitions and acquisitions and has struck a deal with collector Phillip G. Schrager, who has assembled one of the finest contemporary-art collections in the region, reports Alice Thorson in the Kansas City Star.

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