News

  • Carrara Attempts a Marble Renaissance

    There is marble everywhere in the mountains above Tuscany. Artisans and other residents of the historic marble quarry town of Carrara, which produced the stone for Michelangelo's Pieta, are trying to bring the attention of contemporary artists back to the material. A recent exhibition included Sol LeWitt, whose plans for his sculpture requested that the marble for its construction be as indistinguishable as possible from concrete. “As long as they were fairly anonymous blocks of stone, it was OK with me,” said LeWitt. “Nouveau riche houses always have a lot of marble in them.”

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  • Warhol Retrospective Brings Home the Bacon

    A study due out today says the LA MoCA Andy Warhol retrospective, which closed August 18, added $55.8 million to the local economy. Nearly 30 percent of visitors outside the county said the Warhol show was their primary reason for coming to Los Angeles, and this group spent $18 million on hotels alone. Promoted by the Los Angeles Convention & Visitors Bureau and funded by corporate sponsors, private donations, and a $250,000 gift from the city, the $2.7 million exhibition also yielded $2.7 million in profits for the museum itself.

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  • Massachusetts Suffers Deep Cuts in Arts Funding

    The State of Massachusetts's 62 percent cut in state arts funding from $19.1 million to $7.3 million is the deepest in the country, according to the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies. State arts officials believe the cuts themselves will have a negative impact on the economy. Figures show that nonprofit cultural organizations have historically provided the state with a considerable boost.

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  • Doubts Persist About Newly Discovered Rubens

    Sotheby's is reacting angrily to media reports questioning the authenticity of the $120 million Peter Paul Rubens painting reportedly bought by David Thomson, the Canadian billionaire art collector. The Massacre of the Innocents was sold July 10 in London. Doubters have noted that a pigment used in the work was not one used by Rubens and that the wood used also raises questions. Sotheby's, however, states that it is “unaware of any change in the views of the leading experts who supported the attribution at the time.”

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  • “Brit Art” Derided by Simon Rattle

    Sir Simon Rattle, the new artistic director of the Berlin Philharmonic, launched a furious attack on British attitudes to culture, dismissing modern British art as “bullshit” in a recent interview. ''Simon Rattle is a twat and his music is boring,“ responded Dinos Chapman, brother of Jake, both enfants terribles of Brit Art. ”He's a very conventional person with very conventional ideas who simply believes that if something is new, it must be crap."

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  • New Skyscrapers Come in a Few Feet Lower

    When Donald Trump unveiled a revised plan for a Chicago office and residential skyscraper last month, the design was conspicuous for being two feet shorter than the city's third tallest building, the 1,127-foot John Hancock Center.“Yeah, it was conscious,” Trump's architect, Adrian Smith of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill of Chicago, said. “We did not want to be perceived as the highest in the city. No. 4 sounds good.” The now-discarded plans for the World Trade Center site also reflected the new skittishness, suggesting towers only sixty to eighty-five stories high.

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  • Emily Genauer, Art Critic, Dies at Ninety-one

    Emily Genauer, an art critic who championed twentieth-century painting and sculpture over the course of a four-decade newspaper career and won a Pulitzer Prize for criticism, died on Friday after a long illness. She was ninety-one.“I could do it for sixty years because I'd rather look at art than anything else,” Genauer said of art criticism in 1992, “because I love the art world and because every day was different than every other.”

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