News

  • Seven Contenders for the Stirling Prize

    Giles Worsley in the Telegraph presents an evaluation of the seven contenders for British architecture's Stirling Prize, the recipient of which is to be announced next Saturday.

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  • Leaving Las Vegas

    Barbara Bloemink, director of the Guggenheim and Hermitage Museums in Las Vegas, has been named curatorial director of the Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum in New York, writes Carol Vogel in the New York Times.

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  • British Culture To Have New Home Online

    As part of the government's initiative to take Britain online, the Department for Culture, Media, and Sport has created Culture Online (www.culture.gov.uk), which will be responsible for increasing digital access to the nation's cultural heritage, writes Peter Schauer in the Art Newspaper.

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  • National Gallery: New and Improved

    After four years of construction, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, has unveiled a suite of renovated, redesigned, and expanded sculpture galleries on the ground floor of its original West Building, writes Roberta Smith in the New York Times.

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  • Gogol Tale Comes True

    In Saint Petersburg, a statue of a giant nose, inspired by Gogol's story of a man's pursuit of his escaped nose, has vanished, reports the BBC News.

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  • British Museum May Own Stolen Drawings

    The British Museum says there is “compelling” evidence that four drawings in its collection were looted by Nazis around the time of World War II, reports the BBC News.

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  • Walter Annenberg Dies at Ninety-Four

    Walter H. Annenberg, philanthropist, art collector, and former ambassador to Britain who at one time presided over a vast communications empire that included TV Guide, the Philadelphia Inquirer, and the Daily Racing Form, has died at the age of ninety-four, writes Grace Glueck in the New York Times.

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  • More Bad News for the Guggenheim

    Deeply in debt and struggling to meet operating costs, the Guggenheim is planning further layoffs and budget cuts and will scale back its hours open to the public, writes Rachel Donadio in the New York Sun.

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  • Walpole Collection Comes Home

    Sir Robert Walpole's art hoard was sold to Catherine the Great by his cash-strapped grandson. Now “the most celebrated collection in England” is back for a visit, writes Rachel Campbell-Johnston in the London Times.

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  • Reconfiguring Lincoln Center's Open Spaces

    Santiago Calatrava, Cooper Robertson & Partners, Diller & Scofidio, Foster & Partners, and Richard Meier have been invited to submit designs to renew or reconfigure Lincoln Center's six acres of public space as part of its billion-dollar redevelopment, writes Robin Pogrebin in the New York Times.

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  • Museum of Sex Opening Delayed

    Safety hazards due to incomplete installation will delay the opening of New York's newest museum for at least a few days, write Oren Yaniv, Mila Andre, and Maki Becker in the Daily News.

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