News

  • Sotheby's Struggle Continues

    Sotheby's reported a loss of forty-eight million dollars in the third quarter of this year, along with a drop in total revenue compared with the same period last year, writes Georgina Adam in the Art Newspaper.

    Read more
  • Olafur Eliasson Takes on Tate Modern

    Olafur Eliasson will undertake the fourth in the Unilever Series of commissions for Tate Modern, reports the BBC News. Anish Kapoor's work Marsyas—at ten stories high, one of the world's largest indoor sculptures—is currently on display.

    Read more
  • Carole Kismaric, Editor and Curator, Dies at Sixty

    Carole Kismaric, an innovative editor, book packager, and exhibition organizer who helped start the Time-Life Photography Series and for ten years was editorial director of the Aperture Foundation, died yesterday at her home in New York, writes Andy Grundberg in the New York Times. She was sixty.

    Read more
  • Carmen in the Volkswagen Plant

    Flushed out of its nineteenth-century opera house by the calamitous floods of last summer, the Semper Opera of Dresden is staging its latest production in an automobile factory—a shimmering glass-and-steel edifice in which the newest VW, a luxury sedan called the Phaeton, is assembled, writes Mark Landler in the New York Times.

    Read more
  • Even in Minnesota, Arts Funding Drops

    Grant makers and nonprofit groups indicated at least a cyclical dip in arts funding, as well as a possible trend away from the patterns that have consistently put Minnesota above national averages for cultural philanthropy, writes Graydon Royce in the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

    Read more
  • Britain's Art Fund Celebrates a Century

    Britain's Art Fund is celebrating one hundred years, during which it claims to have stopped nearly half a million works of art from going out of the country, with a series of art exhibitions in the most bizarre of locations, including the center of Stonehenge and a private home, writes Fiachra Gibbons in The Guardian.

    Read more
  • Mickey Mouse's Austrian Roots?

    A seven-hundred-year-old fresco bearing an uncanny resemblance to Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse has been discovered in Austria, reports the BBC News. Historians say the creature may in fact be a weasel, which in medieval times was believed to give birth through its ears.

    Read more
  • UNESCO's Director General in the Spotlight

    Koichiro Matsuura, director general of UNESCO, is determined to adapt the organization to the needs of the real world and has managed to begin a major restructuring during the last three years, writes Cristina Carrillo in the Art Newspaper. Perhaps most importantly, UNESCO has persuaded the US to return to membership.

    Read more
  • Bruno Schulz Remembered

    A documentary on his lost wall painting and two new translations greet the sixtieth anniversary of the murder of Polish writer and artist Bruno Schulz, writes Celestine Bohlen in the New York Times.

    Read more
  • Minneapolis Says No to Snowman Statues

    “Tacky, tacky, tacky,” is how council member Gary Schiff described the “Roamin' for SnowMN” proposal, which would have allowed corporate-sponsored snowmen on public sidewalks of Minneapolis, reports Rochelle Olson in the Minneapolis Star Tribune. “I am furious,” said Sue Zellickson, the project's organizer. “It was just to make winter a happy place in Minneapolis.”

    Read more
  • Richard Serra Proposal Hits a Nerve

    A proposed Serra sculpture is causing yelps of protest from an unlikely source—students and faculty members at Caltech, writes Bettijane Levine in the Los Angeles Times.

    Read more
  • Austrian Police Seize Art Said to be Stolen by Nazis

    On Friday, Austrian police seized a painting by Egon Schiele, responding to complaints that it had once belonged to a Jewish collector who was forced to relinquish it in 1938 to a gallery owner connected to the Nazis, writes Peter S. Green in the New York Times. This move is a potential landmark in the battle for restitution of artwork and other property that was taken in Austria as part of a widespread practice called “Aryanization.”

    Read more