News

  • NPR Shifts Away from the Arts

    National Public Radio announced today that it will be cutting jobs in cultural programming and shifting its resources to news and talk.

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  • Phillips Cancels New York Sale

    Phillips, de Pury & Luxembourg just announced the cancellation of their New York sale of nodern art. Instead, the struggling house will hold the auction in London on June 24 at Claridge's.

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  • Returning the Color to van Gogh's Cheeks—and Flowers

    Roy S. Berns, a color scientist named at the Rochester Institute of Technology, recently examined a painting by Vincent van Gogh called White Flowers, 1890, and discovered that they were actually red and pink. The color had faded with time.

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  • Turner Prize Goes Public—A Little

    Robert Hughes is in full flow, and he hasn't even had breakfast yet. Speaking in the early morning, the art critic, historian, and Swiftian rhetorician reaches deep into his vocabulary of contempt when asked his opinion of the Turner prize: “The Turner prize, I'm afraid, has decayed into a total disgrace. It's a soggy, flaccid, in-group exercise in an art world that has run out of steam.” In response to this kind of criticism, the Turner prize will now accept nominations from the public.

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  • MoMA Gets Thirty-seven Works from Corporate Collection

    UBS PaineWebber has promised the Museum of Modern Art thirty-seven works from its vast collection of postwar art that includes seminal paintings, drawings, and sculpture by masters like Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Lucian Freud, and Jasper Johns. The gift will be the subject of an exhibition in 2005, when the Modern's building on 53rd Street in Manhattan reopens after a major expansion.

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  • Pulitzer Prizes Announced

    The New York Times won a record seven Pulitzer Prizes yesterday, including six for its news coverage of the terrorist attack of September 11, its victims, its causes, and its aftermath, all transformative events in the modern history of the United States. The attacks and the war on terrorism were the focus of eight of the fourteen Pulitzer Prizes awarded for journalism.

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  • Dumbo Art

    Brush-wielding elephants have been around for at least twenty years. On Wedesday, the Berkeley Art Museum hosts “Komar and Melamid's Asian Elephant Art and Conservation Project,” which has been retraining elephants whose “jobs” clearing fields had become obsolete to make paintings.

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  • The Russians Are Coming

    When Vladimir Potinin flew from Moscow to New York to be installed as a new trustee of the Guggenheim museum, he brought with him not only the promise of $1 million in donations a year. He also brought with him the realization that new Russia's newly minted superrich are now buying their way into the corporate and cultural boardrooms of the West. Yet questions about the ways their fortunes were acquired may plague them as they seek to put the past behind them.

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  • The First Installation?

    An exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Miami argues that the first installation work was perhaps a Surrealist pavilion created by Salvador Dalí for the 1939 World's Fair in New York.

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  • Early Photographs Triumph Again

    When in 1999 Sotheby’s London held its first sale of photography from the collection of the Parisian bookseller André Jammes, it was a sensation, setting a new world record (for Gustave Le Grey’s Grande vague–Sète at £507,500). A mystery telephone buyer, now known to be Sheik al-Thani of Qatar, who is building up a collection for a museum, was a strong influence on the £7.4 million total and 93 percent sold rate (by lot; by value it was 99.2 percent) of the auction.

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  • Norman Hirschl, Art Dealer, Dies

    Norman S. Hirschl, a founder of the Hirschl & Adler Galleries in Manhattan and an American paintings expert, died at his home in Williamstown, Mass., on Tuesday. He was 86.

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  • Architecture Magazine to Get Renovation

    Architecture, the monthly design magazine that began life ninety years ago, is about to get a radical makeover, shifting its focus to service. The Museum of Modern Art's chief curator of architecture and design called the news disturbing: “It is very troubling,” said Terence Riley, “because Architecture magazine was no esoteric journal, but rather a well-crafted pragmatic publication that mixed design criticism with professional information.”

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