News

  • Sir John Soane's Gets a Facelift

    Restoration of the Sir John Soane Museum should be completed next year, to celebrate the 250th anniversary of the birth of the man many architects regard as the greatest of his kind, writes Maev Kennedy in The Guardian.

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  • Elgin Marbles: Not Returned, But Exchanged?

    The British Museum is considering a radical plan to return the Elgin Marbles to Athens in exchange for a series of rotating exhibitions of ancient Greek artifacts, writes James Morrison in The Independent. Neil MacGregor, the museum's new director, is understood to be contemplating the deal in an effort to raise funds to help reduce the museum's six-million-pound (nine-million-dollar) deficit.

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  • Report Studies Artists' Effect on Neighborhoods

    The New York–based Center for an Urban Future has conducted a neighborhood-by-neighborhood assessment of the potential of arts and culture to stimulate economic growth, writes Robin Pogrebin in the New York Times. The report concludes that artists moving into a neighborhood can drive up rents and force out long-term residential and commercial tenants. The paradox, however, is that arts groups drive up the rents and then cannot afford to remain in the neighborhoods whose rejuvenation they spurred in the first place.

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  • Munich's New Home for Modern Art

    In September, Munich inaugurated the Pinakothek der Moderne, whose collection spans from Beckmann to Bacon to Beuys. Its curators say it represents a definitive break with the city's relative apathy toward twentieth-century art, writes Desmond Butler in the New York Times.

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  • International Center of Photography to Establish Triennial

    At a time when photography has become a collecting priority in museums, the International Center of Photography has announced plans to establish the first photography triennial in the United States, writes Carol Vogel in the New York Times. To be held in September, it will present a survey of contemporary international photography with a focus on works by emerging and midcareer artists.

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  • Museo del Barrio Reconsiders Its Role

    The debate over the long-term vision for New York's Museo del Barrio is about to fall into the lap of Julian Zugazagoitia, 38, the institution's newly appointed director and the first who is not Puerto Rican, writes Mireya Navarro in the New York Times.

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  • Bay Area Collector Plans to Sell

    San Francisco investment banker Thomas Weisel will put twenty-one works up for auction at Sotheby's, writes Kenneth Baker in the San Francisco Chronicle. Involving major paintings by Willem de Kooning, Arshile Gorky, Franz Kline, David Park, Wayne Thiebaud, and Nathan Oliveira, the sale is expected to bring up to sixty million dollars.

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  • News Flash: Art Critics Not Criticizing

    By and large, journalistic art critics don't write art criticism, writes Christopher Knight in the Los Angeles Times. In a report published by the National Arts Journalism Program at Columbia University, only 27 percent of art journalists surveyed said they place a great deal of emphasis on “forming and expressing judgments” in their reviews.

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  • Unlikely Partnership Spurs State Grant

    The Bowers Museum of Cultural Art in Santa Ana, California, will get four million dollars of state bond money to help it build a new wing to house revolving collections from the British Museum in London, writes Mike Boehm in the Los Angeles Times. The British Museum's traveling “Egyptian Treasures” exhibition was a big hit at the Bowers in 2000 and gave rise to talks about an ongoing partnership between the London and Santa Ana institutions.

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  • Picasso Sculpture Breaks a Record

    A Picasso sculpture has sold for a record price of 6.7 million dollars (4.2 million pounds) at Christie's in New York, while two other paintings, Monet's waterlilies and a Modigliani portrait, both remained unsold, reports the BBC News. The sale of La guenon et son petit, a 1951 bronze of a baboon cradling her young, drew enthusiastic bidding and a final price just under its estimate of seven million dollars (4.47 million pounds), making it the sale's top lot.

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  • British Corporate Sponsorhip Takes a Dive

    In Britain, as corporate sponsorship becomes harder to secure, arts organizations are turning to individual patrons for support, reports Rupert Christiansen in The Telegraph. Research by consultants Arts & Business shows that in the last financial year corporate sponsorship dropped from 150 million pounds (235 million dollars) to 114 million pounds (179 million dollars)—and all this year's dips and dives should send that figure crashing a further 20 to 30 percent.

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