News

  • Funds Made Available for Purchase of Scottish Art

    The Scottish Arts Council will give approximately 350,000 pounds (541,000 dollars) to ten museums in Scotland's major towns and cities in order for them to update their art collections with contemporary work, writes Phil Miller in the Glasgow Herald.

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  • Paintings Moved for Fear of Flooding

    Leading Paris museums, including the Louvre and the Musée d'Orsay, are to move thousands of priceless artworks from their basement storerooms because of a feared “superflood” in the French capital this winter, writes Jon Henley in The Guardian.

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  • Bush Proposes Poet for NEA Post

    Dana Gioia, a poet, critic, and translator, is President Bush's choice to head the National Endowment for the Arts, reports Carl Hartman for the Associated Press.

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  • Vicente Todoli Takes the Reins

    Spaniard Vicente Todoli takes over as the new director of Tate Modern this month with a twenty-year career in museums behind him, writes Cristina Carrillo in the Art Newspaper.

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  • Fred Wilson To Represent US in Venice

    Fred Wilson has been selected to represent the United States at the 2003 Venice Biennale, writes Carol Vogel in the New York Times. Kathleen Goncharov, the public art curator at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology List Visual Arts Center in Cambridge, will be the commissioner for the United States Pavilion.

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  • Wales Announces Major New Art Award

    Wales has staked its claim to international recognition in the visual-art world with the launch of a major prize, reports the BBC News. At forty thousand pounds (sixty-two thousand dollars) the Artes Mundi prize is the biggest award to be offered to an individual artist.

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  • Getty Gets the Go-ahead

    After years of contention, a California appellate court has cleared the way for the Getty Center to add a 450-seat outdoor theater and make other changes at its villa in Pacific Palisades, writes Christopher Reynolds in the Los Angeles Times.

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  • Funding Falls $46 Million Short for British Museums

    Curators of regional museums as well as London's British Museum protested today after the government's promised bailout fell thirty million pounds (forty-six million dollars) short of what they say is needed to prevent eventual meltdown, writes Fiachra Gibbons in The Guardian.

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  • Niemeyer Home Sparks Preservation Dispute

    As a battle rages over the preservation of the only private residence in the US designed by Oscar Niemeyer, Los Angeles wakes up to its cultural heritage, writes Nicolai Ouroussoff in the Los Angeles Times.

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  • Iraqi Sculptor Breaks the Mold

    Iraq's greatest sculptor, Mohammad Ghani, now makes work in reaction to the UN sanctions imposed on his country twelve years ago, reports Rory McCarthy in The Guardian. Despite Ghani's international reputation, this body of work has not been shown in public in Iraq.

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  • Australia Looks into Trust Funds for Artists

    The Australia Council for the Arts has announced an investigation into establishing trust accounts for artists, writes Lenny Ann Low in the Sydney Morning Herald. When work is sold the artist's portion of the sale will be lodged in a trust fund and not used by the gallery for any other purpose.

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  • Some, But Not Enough for the British Museum

    After being granted a one-time sum of fifty-seven million dollars by the British government, officials at the cash-strapped British Museum have warned that even this will not be enough for the institution's long-term plans, reports the BBC News.

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