News

  • Early Photographs Triumph Again

    When in 1999 Sotheby’s London held its first sale of photography from the collection of the Parisian bookseller André Jammes, it was a sensation, setting a new world record (for Gustave Le Grey’s Grande vague–Sète at £507,500). A mystery telephone buyer, now known to be Sheik al-Thani of Qatar, who is building up a collection for a museum, was a strong influence on the £7.4 million total and 93 percent sold rate (by lot; by value it was 99.2 percent) of the auction.

    Read more
  • Norman Hirschl, Art Dealer, Dies

    Norman S. Hirschl, a founder of the Hirschl & Adler Galleries in Manhattan and an American paintings expert, died at his home in Williamstown, Mass., on Tuesday. He was 86.

    Read more
  • Architecture Magazine to Get Renovation

    Architecture, the monthly design magazine that began life ninety years ago, is about to get a radical makeover, shifting its focus to service. The Museum of Modern Art's chief curator of architecture and design called the news disturbing: “It is very troubling,” said Terence Riley, “because Architecture magazine was no esoteric journal, but rather a well-crafted pragmatic publication that mixed design criticism with professional information.”

    Read more
  • Pittsburgh's Frick Gets New Chief

    After a yearlong search, the Frick Art & Historical Center has a new executive director: William B. Bodine Jr., chief curator of the Columbia Museum of Art in Columbia, SC. Bodine, 53, is an art historian and administrator who has garnered extensive experience in a variety of positions in museums and arts organizations around the country.

    Read more
  • São Paulo Bienal Ruckus

    The curator of the 25th Bienal de São Paulo, Alfons Hug has eliminated the historical section of the exhibition, drawing fire from editorialists.

    Read more
  • MoMA Moving Out

    Less than two months remain before the Museum of Modern Art bows off the Manhattan stage. In the last few weeks, the trucks have begun to roll between Manhattan and Queens, sometimes as many as five a day. The first department to move was the library, with its 180,000 volumes; next is architecture and design, then painting and sculpture, and on down the list, thirty-five departments in all.

    Read more
  • Whitney Biennial Bucksbaum Award Winner Announced

    With its Biennial just three weeks old, the Whitney Museum of American Art is trying to create more buzz by announcing the winner of its second Bucksbaum Award, given to an emerging artist living and working in the United States whose work is in the Biennial. The award carries a $100,000 stipend and residency. This year's winner is Irit Batsry, an Israeli-born video and installation artist whose contribution to this year's Biennial is an eighty-minute film, These Are Not My Images (Neither There Nor Here).

    Read more
  • Inside the Outside

    Over the last three decades, the hierarchy of high and low that dominated culture at midcentury has softened. Yet, suggests Roberta Smith, the division between outsider and insider art remains well policed by advocates of both sides.

    Read more
  • Van Gogh “Fake” Real

    Art experts have declared genuine a painting by Vincent van Gogh that eminent art expert Geraldine Norman claimed to be a forgery.

    Read more
  • Out of Art

    After 300 years of collecting the painting, sculpture, and other art objects of Western culture, we are simply running out of art, suggests Souren Melikian.

    Read more