News

  • Stirling Prize Goes to Gateshead Bridge

    The Millennium bridge in Gateshead has received the Stirling Prize, Britain's premier architectural award, writes Peter Hetherington in The Guardian. Questions have been raised about whether the world's first tilting bridge represents design at its best or simply adventurous engineering.

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  • Director of Wadsworth Atheneum Moves On

    As the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art raises funds for a $120 million expansion, Kate M. Sellers, its director, has announced plans to leave her post, writes Frank Rizzo in the Hartford Courant.

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  • Vera G. List, Philanthropist, Dies at Ninety-Four

    Vera G. List, a forward-looking philanthropist whose causes included contemporary art, opera, education, and social justice, died Thursday at her home in Greenwich, Connecticut, at the age of ninety-four, writes Roberta Smith in the New York Times.

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  • Beck Collection Does Not Disappoint

    At Sotheby's in London, the Beck Collection—a trove of German Expressionism including work by Macke, Schlemmer, Jawlensky, and Kandinsky—brought in more than four million euros, writes Souren Melikian in the International Herald Tribune.

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  • Yoko Ono Funds and Bestows Award For Peace

    On Wednesday at the United Nations in Geneva, Yoko Ono inaugurated her own peace award, giving fifty thousand dollars to artists Zvi Goldstein (an Israeli) and Khalil Rabah (a Palestinian), reports the BBC News.

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  • Even In Canada, Funding Drops For Arts

    Toronto's financial support of its major cultural institutions has declined by 35 percent in the past decade, at the same time that the regional economy has grown by 40 percent, James Adams writes in the Toronto Globe and Mail.

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  • Supreme Court Hears Arguments on Copyrights for Arts

    This week, the justices of the Supreme Court heard a much-anticipated oral argument on a novel constitutional issue, writes Charles Lane in the Washington Post. For how long may Congress extend copyrights on literature, art, music, and film?

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  • Turner Descendants Fight to Reclaim Paintings

    Descendants of J.M.W. Turner are threatening to take back hundreds of his paintings, claiming that the Tate and the National Gallery are not honoring the terms of his will, writes Nilufer Atik in the Evening Standard.

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  • Statue of Adam Shatters at New York's Met

    A fifteenth-century marble statue of Adam by Venetian sculptor Tullio Lombardo crashed to the ground at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, scattering its arms, its legs, and an ornamental tree trunk into dozens of pieces, writes Celestine Bohlen in the New York Times.

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  • Scottish Museum Scores Some Beuys

    The Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art has purchased a collection of Joseph Beuys's drawings, lithographs, photographs, books, and sculptures— amounting to a third of all multiples produced by the artist—for approximately 950,000 dollars, writes Fiachra Gibbons in The Guardian.

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