News

  • Richard Serra Proposal Hits a Nerve

    A proposed Serra sculpture is causing yelps of protest from an unlikely source—students and faculty members at Caltech, writes Bettijane Levine in the Los Angeles Times.

    Read more
  • Austrian Police Seize Art Said to be Stolen by Nazis

    On Friday, Austrian police seized a painting by Egon Schiele, responding to complaints that it had once belonged to a Jewish collector who was forced to relinquish it in 1938 to a gallery owner connected to the Nazis, writes Peter S. Green in the New York Times. This move is a potential landmark in the battle for restitution of artwork and other property that was taken in Austria as part of a widespread practice called “Aryanization.”

    Read more
  • Report: Boston's Arts Organizations

    Boston is home to more arts organizations per capita than any other major metropolitan area, according to the preliminary results of a Boston Foundation study, writes Maureen Dezell in the Boston Globe.

    Read more
  • Finalists Selected for Citibank Photography Prize

    Jürgen Teller, Jitka Hanzlova, Bertien van Manen, and Simon Norfolk are on the shortlist for the twenty-thousand-pound (thirty-one-thousand-dollar) Citibank Award, Britain's most prestigious photography prize, writes Fiachra Gibbons in The Guardian.

    Read more
  • Vocal Protest Against Belfast Arts Cuts

    Artists picketed the Belfast Arts Council's Arts Awards last night to highlight what they felt was official hypocrisy in celebrating their achievements while cutting their budgets by 21.5 percent, writes Fiachra Gibbons in The Guardian.

    Read more
  • Postwar Records Set at Christie's

    Of the seventy-five works on offer at Christie's sale of postwar and contemporary art last night, only thirteen failed to sell, writes Carol Vogel in the New York Times. Barnett Newman's 1953 White Fire I, shipped from Tate Modern for the sale, sold for 3.8 million dollars.

    Read more
  • Skyscraper Proposal Sparks Debate

    A developer hopes to build a ninety-story skyscraper only a block from the World Trade Center site, writes Charles V. Bagli in the New York Times. Designed by Kohn Pederson Fox, the structure would be the second-highest in Manhattan.

    Read more
  • Auction View from Across the Atlantic

    Last week New York staged its big autumn sales of Impressionist and Modern paintings, three glamour evenings at Sotheby’s, Christie’s, and Phillips at which rich Americans were squeezed for a total of 164 million dollars, notes Godfrey Barker in The Times.

    Read more
  • Disappointment for San Francisco Collector

    The sale of San Francisco investment banker Thomas Weisel's choice examples of early New York School painting and related California works brought thirty-three million dollars last night at Sotheby's, writes Kenneth Baker in the San Francisco Chronicle. The sale had been expected to bring up to sixty million dollars.

    Read more
  • British Museum's Final Word Is No

    After making the biggest concessions in the three-decades-long dispute over the return of the Elgin Marbles, the Greeks' great hope of making a breakthrough were effectively buried again yesterday, writes Fiachra Gibbons in The Guardian.

    Read more
  • Phillips Gets Much-Needed Boost

    In a reversal of fortune that few in the art world expected, Phillips, de Pury & Luxembourg held a strong sale of contemporary art last night, writes Carol Vogel in the New York Times. One of the works that fetched its estimate was Jeff Koons's Self-Portrait, a 1991 marble bust, which went to Anthony D'Offay for two million dollars.

    Read more
  • Elgin Marbles Dispute Heats Up

    Greece is continuing its diplomatic efforts to see the Elgin Marbles in Athens in time for the 2004 Olympics, reports CNN News. Despite rumors to the contrary, British Museum director Neil MacGregor has insisted the frieze sculptures would not leave Britain, adding that “The trustees' position is that the marbles are an integral part of the British Museum and they cannot be lent without damaging the museum's role.”

    Read more