News

  • Baryshnikov Plans an Interdisciplinary Center for Dance

    Mikhail Baryshnikov is making plans and fundraising for a new arts center in Manhattan distinguished by a laboratory in which artists will work with mentors from the worlds of dance, theater, film, lighting, and costume design, writes Jennifer Dunning in the New York Times. Participants will be chosen by an artistic advisory panel which includes Pedro Almodóvar, Merce Cunningham, William Forsythe, Georgian puppeteer Rezo Gabriadze, violinist Gidon Kremer, Peter Sellars, Susan Sontag, and lighting designer Jennifer Tipton.

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  • Muschamp Likes What He Sees

    Unlike the initial group of proposals released by the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation last July, seven new plans for the World Trade Center site throb with energy, imagination, intelligence and the sheer thrill of contributing to a battered city's rebirth, writes Herbert Muschamp in the New York Times.

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  • The Whitney Branches Out?

    A Whitney Museum is being considered for Miami, writes Elisa Turner in the Miami Herald. “There's a strong case to be made that this is the most exciting city in the country,'' said Whitney director Maxwell Anderson. ”I don't want to do what all of us worry about—disrupt private patronage and civic funding here. I want to craft more support for the arts. I hope to talk with each of the museums here to ensure that the Whitney coming here would be not a problem but an opportunity.''

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  • Annelies Strba Photo Causes Trouble in London

    The owner of Rhodes + Mann Gallery in East London was threatened with arrest for showing a picture by Annelies Strba of her daughter in a bath, after a passerby complained to the police, writes Fiachra Gibbon in The Guardian.

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  • Art Student to Be Prosecuted for Union Square Action

    The thirty-seven black boxes with the word FEAR on them, which mysteriously turned up attached to girders and walls in the Union Square subway station last Wednesday, were, as you may have guessed from the start, an art project, writes Michael Kimmelman in the New York Times. The boxes, which spread panic and caused the police to shut the station for hours and call in the bomb squad, turn out to be the work of a twenty-five-year-old freshman at the School of Visual Arts in Manhattan, who surrendered Monday to the Manhattan district attorney's office.

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  • New WTC Plans to Be Unveiled Today

    Today a new set of plans for the World Trade Center site will be presented at the Winter Garden of the World Financial Center at Battery Park City, writes Herbert Muschamp in the New York Times. The participants include some of the most influential figures in contemporary architecture: Richard Meier, Steven Holl, Rafael Viñoly, Peter Eisenman, Greg Lynn, Lord Foster, Charles Gwathmey, Daniel Libeskind, Ben van Berkel and Shigeru Ban. Not since 1947, when an international design team met to plan the United Nations headquarters, has a comparable list of architectural talent set to work on a New

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  • Breton's Possessions Go on the Block

    The contents of André Breton's apartment—paintings, objects, photos, manuscripts, books—are to go on sale this April in Paris, writes Alan Riding in the New York Times. One measure of the size of the sale is that the auction house, CalmelsCohen, plans at least six catalogues to cover the 5,300 lots. The auction is expected to raise $30–40 million.

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  • Old Masters Market May Be Drying Up

    The Old Masters market has long been plagued by supply problems, but in the current uncertain political and economic climate there are signs that this is starting to turn into a drought, writes Will Bennett in The Telegraph.

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  • Canaletto Hidden in Plain View

    A painting that had lain unrecognized for nearly one hundred fifty years in the National Galleries of Scotland has been identified as the work of Canaletto and valued at two million pounds (over three million dollars), according to a report in The Guardian.

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  • New Art Flourishes at MIT

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology's percent-for-art program was recently codified into a policy by which every new building or renovation project dedicates 1 percent of its budget, up to $250,000, to new art, writes Ann Wilson Lloyd in the New York Times. Projects include a Matthew Ritchie mural, architecture by Steven Holl and Frank Gehry, Dan Graham's walk-in, mirrored glass “Yin/Yang Pavilion,” to be installed in April, Jenny Holzer's involvement in the redesign of a major road through campus, and two large photographs by Candida Höfer for the Aeronautics and Astronautics building.

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  • Getty Center Celebrates Five Years

    The Getty Center in Los Angeles—which houses the J. Paul Getty Trust's offices and programs, including a museum, institutes for art conservation and research, and a grant program, on a twenty-four-acre campus carved out of a 750-acre property in Brentwood—celebrates its fifth anniversary today, writes Suzanne Muchnic in the Los Angeles Times. “Before we opened, we anticipated that our maximum crowd would be 1.4 million,” says Deborah Gribbon, director of the Getty Museum. “We are operating very close to what we thought would be our capacity.”

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  • Wright House Outbid on a Piece of Its History

    A Frank Lloyd Wright lamp designed in 1903 for the Dana-Thomas House in Springfield, Illinois, was sold at auction Tuesday at Christie's for a record-breaking two million dollars, writes Linda Hales in the Washington Post. One of the bidders was a civic-minded “friend” of the house whose goal was to send the fixture home, but it was not to be.

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