News

  • Museo del Barrio Reconsiders Its Role

    The debate over the long-term vision for New York's Museo del Barrio is about to fall into the lap of Julian Zugazagoitia, 38, the institution's newly appointed director and the first who is not Puerto Rican, writes Mireya Navarro in the New York Times.

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  • Bay Area Collector Plans to Sell

    San Francisco investment banker Thomas Weisel will put twenty-one works up for auction at Sotheby's, writes Kenneth Baker in the San Francisco Chronicle. Involving major paintings by Willem de Kooning, Arshile Gorky, Franz Kline, David Park, Wayne Thiebaud, and Nathan Oliveira, the sale is expected to bring up to sixty million dollars.

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  • News Flash: Art Critics Not Criticizing

    By and large, journalistic art critics don't write art criticism, writes Christopher Knight in the Los Angeles Times. In a report published by the National Arts Journalism Program at Columbia University, only 27 percent of art journalists surveyed said they place a great deal of emphasis on “forming and expressing judgments” in their reviews.

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  • Unlikely Partnership Spurs State Grant

    The Bowers Museum of Cultural Art in Santa Ana, California, will get four million dollars of state bond money to help it build a new wing to house revolving collections from the British Museum in London, writes Mike Boehm in the Los Angeles Times. The British Museum's traveling “Egyptian Treasures” exhibition was a big hit at the Bowers in 2000 and gave rise to talks about an ongoing partnership between the London and Santa Ana institutions.

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  • Picasso Sculpture Breaks a Record

    A Picasso sculpture has sold for a record price of 6.7 million dollars (4.2 million pounds) at Christie's in New York, while two other paintings, Monet's waterlilies and a Modigliani portrait, both remained unsold, reports the BBC News. The sale of La guenon et son petit, a 1951 bronze of a baboon cradling her young, drew enthusiastic bidding and a final price just under its estimate of seven million dollars (4.47 million pounds), making it the sale's top lot.

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  • British Corporate Sponsorhip Takes a Dive

    In Britain, as corporate sponsorship becomes harder to secure, arts organizations are turning to individual patrons for support, reports Rupert Christiansen in The Telegraph. Research by consultants Arts & Business shows that in the last financial year corporate sponsorship dropped from 150 million pounds (235 million dollars) to 114 million pounds (179 million dollars)—and all this year's dips and dives should send that figure crashing a further 20 to 30 percent.

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  • The National Gallery's New Front Door

    The east entrance to the National Gallery is about to become the most expensive front door in Britain: Opening the towering glossy black door to the public, after 170 years, will cost twenty-one million pounds (thirty-three million dollars), writes Maev Kennedy in The Guardian.

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  • New Architecture Enlivens Downtown L.A.

    Thanks to some significant new public buildings—Frank Gehry's Walt Disney Concert Hall for the LA Philharmonic, Rafael Moneo's new Cathedral Our Lady of the Angels, and others—and the conversion of old buildlings into apartments, downtown Los Angeles may be taking off at last, write Cathleen McGuigan and David Jefferson in Newsweek.

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  • At Phillips, Major Works Remain Unsold

    A Picasso portrait and a Monet landscape, a Matisse cutout and a Henry Moore sculpture—works that would have easily brought millions of dollars in seasons past—were just a few examples of big-ticket Impressionist and modern art that failed to sell on Monday night at Phillips, de Pury & Luxembourg, writes Carol Vogel in the New York Times.

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  • Oregon Firm to Design Craft Museum's New Home

    The Museum of Contemporary Arts and Design, formerly known as the American Craft Museum, has chosen Allied Works Architecture, an architectural firm from Portland, Oregon, to design its new quarters at 2 Columbus Circle, writes Celestine Bohlen in the New York Times.

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  • NEA Delays Reorganization

    The National Endowment for the Arts announced yesterday that it would halt a staff reorganization that some arts groups had criticized so that a new chairman could review the plan after taking office, writes Robin Pogrebin in the New York Times.

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  • New Fuel for Elgin Marbles Debate

    A letter that could fuel the long-running international dispute over the ownership of the Elgin Marbles is to be sold at auction for an estimated one thousand pounds (1,500 dollars), reports the BBC News. The letter was written in 1811 by the British ambassador to Constantinople (Istanbul), Robert Adair, and addressed to Thomas Bruce, the seventh Earl of Elgin, suggesting that the earl had no right to buy the fifth-century marbles.

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