News

  • Milwaukee Art Museum and the New York Times in Row

    Writing in the New York Times,Deborah Solomon recently called the Milwaukee Art Museum's collection “B-level.” Now, the museum's director, Russell Bowman, has written a letter to the gray lady pointing out that she never visited the museum to write her article and make her judgement.

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  • Cleveland Museum of Art to Get Much-Needed Breathing Room

    Rafael Vinoly's $170 million expansion of the Cleveland Museum of Art is set to give the prominent collection some much-needed breathing—and viewing—room. Set to unveil his initial concepts on February 12, what can we except from 57-year-old native of Uruguay and former concert pianist?

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  • Carnegie Acquires Archive of African-American Life

    The Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh has acquired one of the largest known photo archives of African-American life. With 80,000 negatives of work by Charles H. Harris, the museum is planning a retrospective, but not until it has catalogued and digitized all the images.

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  • Digital Art Gets Past the First Hurdle

    With the crash of the Net economy, the carpetbaggers have cleared out, leaving the die-hards and the Internet artists who pioneered Net.art. But will they be able to create work that can become self-sustaining and draw a wide audience?

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  • A New Museum in Buenos Aires

    Despite Argentina's three-year recession, Buenos Aires, Eduardo Constantini has opened a new museum to house his important collection of 20th-century Latin American art.

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  • Jean-Christophe Ammann Bids Farewell to Frankfurt

    In his ten years at the Frankfurt Museum of Modern Art (MMK), founding director Jean-Christophe Ammann opted for a dynamic exhibition and acquisition program that resembled the exhibition gallery or the pages of a magazine more than the traditional museum.

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  • Filling the Void at Ground Zero

    The void where the Twin Towers once stood symbolizes not only the destruction of the two buildings, argues Herbert Muschamp, but also the demise of public planning in New York. Can “Ground Zero” mark the beginning of a new sense of history in the city's architecture?

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  • A Studio Program at the End of the World

    When the British Antarctic Survey launched its Artists and Writers program, Keith Grant and Philip Hughes were up to the challenge. What is it like to make art in one of the last wilderness areas of the world?

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