News

  • Art Thief Leaves More Than Fingerprint

    An art thief left behind part of his finger after cutting it off while stealing a $65,000 Frances Hodgkins painting from an Auckland gallery yesterday in what is being called a theft to order, writes Ainsley Thomson in the New Zealand News.

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  • Philadelphia Museum Plans to Expand

    The Philadelphia Museum of Art will increase the size of its hundred-thousand-square-foot building by one-third, writes Patricia Horn in the Philadelphia Inquirer. The museum has raised 171 million dollars of a 200-million-dollar capital campaign to pay for the construction, increase its endowment, and expand its programs.

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  • Quebec Considers Income Supplements for Artists

    Quebec artists deserve income supplements because of their unpredictable job prospects, Premier Bernard Landry said on Monday, according to a report on CNews.com. The Workers' Compensation Board and the Family Allowance board are discussing income programs that could be geared toward the arts community, Landry said following a meeting with an artists' association.

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  • War Fears Slow Loans to New York

    Concerns over terrorism are complicating the large international loan exhibitions that have long been the lifeblood of museums, especially in places like New York that are considered a prime target for attacks, writes Carol Vogel in the New York Times. Three months ago, Philippe de Montebello, director of the Metropolitan Museum, and Glenn D. Lowry, director of the Museum of Modern Art, made a hasty trip to Paris to talk with museum officials there who were threatening to pull their loans from several major New York shows.

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  • Elgin Marbles Staying Put

    The director of the British Museum has announced that the Elgin marbles will never be returned to Greece, even on loan, writes Chris Hastings in The Telegraph. In a ruling that will infuriate the Greek authorities, Neil MacGregor—who took over as director of the museum last August—said that the marbles could “do most good” in their current home, where they are seen in a broader historical context.

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  • Australia Art Center Wins Record Crowds

    Melbourne's new Ian Potter Centre has become one of the world's most popular exhibition spaces, according to National Gallery of Victoria director Gerard Vaughan, writes Robin Usher in the Age. According to Vaughn, the Centre Pompidou and the Musée d'Orsay in Paris receive up to four thousand visitors a day, while the Ian Potter Centre was getting about eight thousand.

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  • Libeskind WTC Site Front Runner

    The design of Daniel Libeskind is expected to be chosen for the World Trade Center site, although some of its central features are likely to be either radically altered or left out, writes Gary Younge in The Guardian.

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  • Painting Reattributed to Botticelli at National Gallery

    The National Gallery in London may not have stopped the Northumberland Raphael from being California-bound (yet), but in the meantime, they have uncovered an early painting by Sandro Botticelli, writes Paul Jeromack in the Art Newspaper. Previously catalogued as a work by a “Follower of Botticelli, c. 1490–1500”, the panel was purchased (as a Filippino Lippi) in 1858 by the National Gallery's then director, Sir Charles Eastlake.

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  • Albers Mural May Resurface at New School

    For more than two years, a mural by German-born artist and colorist Josef Albers, which had adorned the lobby of the MetLife Building on Park Avenue since it was completed forty years ago, has been sitting in storage, writes Carol Vogel in the New York Times. But Manhattan, as Albers called the piece, may come to life again, in an exact replication, at the New School University.

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  • Potamkin Collection to Be Split Up

    Philadelphia's Potamkin collection of American art, one of the best of its kind in private hands, is being broken up, writes Edward J. Sozanski in the Philadelphia Inquirer. The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts will receive Marsden Hartley's Flower Abstraction, 1914, Georgia O'Keeffe's Red Canna, 1923, and Maurice Prendergast's Promenade, 1912–13, among other works. The Potamkin heirs and Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, Meyer Potamkin's alma mater, will receive the rest of the collection.

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  • British Gov't Asked to Help Prevent Exports

    The British government was urged last night to give a direct grant to save Raphael's Madonna of the Pinks for the National Gallery, and to provide an extra thirty million pounds a year to stop the loss to Britain of significant works of art, writes Maeve Kennedy in The Guardian.

    Sir John Guinness, chairman of the culture ministry's reviewing committee on the exports of works of art, described a reception held to mark the fiftieth anniversary of his committee as not a celebration but a “funeral wake for those lost.”

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  • Blake Drawings Rediscovered and Sold

    A group of William Blake watercolors that were found in a Glasgow secondhand-book shop have sold for five million pounds (eight million dollars), reports the BBC News. The nineteen works illustrate Robert Blair's Gothic poem “The Grave.”

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