News

  • Museum Under Review: Too “Politically Correct”?

    Australia's National Museum is set to become an ideological battleground for the government, with the appointment of Melbourne academic John Carroll to assess whether the institution is too “politically correct,” writes Annabel Crabb in The Age. The review follows a recent decision by the board to reduce the term of museum director Dawn Casey—an Aborigine—to a one-year contract and brings to a head the conflict between the museum's council and its curatorial staff over the institution's direction.

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  • Americans for the Arts Happily Makes Plans

    Americans for the Arts, an arts advocacy group, is pondering the question of what to do with the 120 million dollars it received in November from the philanthropist Ruth Lilly, writes Stephen Kinzer in the New York Times. “Our goal is access to the arts for all Americans,” said Robert L. Lynch, the arts group's president. “The way we hope to achieve that is by putting facts and information in the hands of decision-makers.”

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  • John M. Brealey, Conservator at Met, Dies at Seventy-seven

    John M. Brealey, the chairman of paintings conservation at the Metropolitan Museum of Art from 1975 to 1989, died last Thursday at the age of seventy-seven, writes John Russell in the New York Times. Widely regarded as one of the most accomplished of living picture restorers, Brealy was also a consultant to the Yale Center for British Art and consultant and restorer to the Frick Collection.

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  • Paris Museums Prepare for Flooding

    Paris is clearing works of art from city basements and putting rescue boats on standby as it prepares for the possibility of the worst flooding from the river Seine in ninety years, reports CNN.com.

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  • Guggenheim Las Vegas Turns Out the Lights

    The Guggenheim Las Vegas, a soaring exhibition hall designed by Rem Koolhaas that opened just fifteen months ago, will go dark on January 5 for an indefinite period while the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York looks for a sponsor for the hall's next exhibition, writes Celestine Bohlen in the New York Times. In the last year, the Guggenheim's operating budget has constricted drastically, followed by an equally dramatic reduction in staff, to 181 full-time positions from 339 in November 2001.

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  • Turner Windfall Won't Go Toward Reynolds Purchase

    The Tate is unlikely to use the 14.6 million pound (twenty-three million dollar) profit it made from the recovery of its two stolen J.M.W. Turner masterpieces to save Sir Joshua Reynolds's outstanding Portrait of Omai for the nation, writes Fiachra Gibbons in The Guardian. Last week the Tate renewed its campaign to stop the spectacular painting of the Pacific islander who enthralled London society and the court of George III from going to a mystery buyer in Dublin.

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  • Art L.A.: The Year in Review

    Los Angeles Times art critic Christopher Knight blasts the boards of local art institutions for a year of lackluster giving and runs down a list of 2002's notable art events.

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  • Couple Charged in Theft from Irish Stately Home

    A couple have been charged with handling five stolen paintings that were stolen from a stately home in County Wicklow, Ireland, in September, reports the BBC News. The five masterpieces, including two by Peter Paul Rubens, were found by police on Friday night, nearly three months after they disappeared from Russborough House, the stately home of the late South African diamond millionaire Sir Alfred Beit.

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  • Turners Returned Through Tate's Hidden Efforts

    The Tate spent three and a half million pounds (five million dollars) on an extraordinary operation to return two of its greatest paintings by J.M.W. Turner stolen from a German art gallery eight years ago, writes Fiachra Gibbons in The Guardian. A sizable chunk of the cash the Tate handed to the German authorities went to pay a chain of informers and middlemen, some with strong connections to the Serbian underworld, for “information” on the paintings, now worth around fifty million pounds (eighty million dollars).

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  • Hunt for Painting at a Crossroads

    Twin sisters hunting for paintings stolen from their family by Nazis have come close to locating one of them but have been blocked from attempting to recover it by a confidentiality agreement, writes Howard Reich in the Chicago Tribune. An appraiser hired by Christie's believes he saw the painting in the home of a client, but Christie's refuses to disclose that person's identity.

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  • Giovanni Intra, Critic and Art Dealer, Dies at Thirty-four

    Giovanni Intra, an artist, writer, and pioneering entrepreneur in Los Angeles's burgeoning Chinatown gallery scene, died Monday in New York, writes Susanne Muchnic in the Los Angeles Times. He was thirty-four. Born and raised in New Zealand, Intra moved to Los Angeles in 1996, after winning a Fulbright to study at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. In January 1999 he and Steven Hanson opened China Art Objects Galleries and helped transform Chung King Road into an edgy showcase for contemporary art. Intra “had a lot of energy and enthusiasm for young artists,” Times art critic Christopher

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  • Shift in Taste Detected at Tate Britain

    A painting by British artist Lucian Freud has emerged as the top-selling postcard at the Tate Britain in London in 2002, reports the BBC News. Freud's Girl With White Dog,1952, has beaten the previous top seller, Ophelia, by Victorian artist Millais.

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