News

  • Disappointment for San Francisco Collector

    The sale of San Francisco investment banker Thomas Weisel's choice examples of early New York School painting and related California works brought thirty-three million dollars last night at Sotheby's, writes Kenneth Baker in the San Francisco Chronicle. The sale had been expected to bring up to sixty million dollars.

    Read more
  • British Museum's Final Word Is No

    After making the biggest concessions in the three-decades-long dispute over the return of the Elgin Marbles, the Greeks' great hope of making a breakthrough were effectively buried again yesterday, writes Fiachra Gibbons in The Guardian.

    Read more
  • Phillips Gets Much-Needed Boost

    In a reversal of fortune that few in the art world expected, Phillips, de Pury & Luxembourg held a strong sale of contemporary art last night, writes Carol Vogel in the New York Times. One of the works that fetched its estimate was Jeff Koons's Self-Portrait, a 1991 marble bust, which went to Anthony D'Offay for two million dollars.

    Read more
  • Elgin Marbles Dispute Heats Up

    Greece is continuing its diplomatic efforts to see the Elgin Marbles in Athens in time for the 2004 Olympics, reports CNN News. Despite rumors to the contrary, British Museum director Neil MacGregor has insisted the frieze sculptures would not leave Britain, adding that “The trustees' position is that the marbles are an integral part of the British Museum and they cannot be lent without damaging the museum's role.”

    Read more
  • Sir John Soane's Gets a Facelift

    Restoration of the Sir John Soane Museum should be completed next year, to celebrate the 250th anniversary of the birth of the man many architects regard as the greatest of his kind, writes Maev Kennedy in The Guardian.

    Read more
  • Elgin Marbles: Not Returned, But Exchanged?

    The British Museum is considering a radical plan to return the Elgin Marbles to Athens in exchange for a series of rotating exhibitions of ancient Greek artifacts, writes James Morrison in The Independent. Neil MacGregor, the museum's new director, is understood to be contemplating the deal in an effort to raise funds to help reduce the museum's six-million-pound (nine-million-dollar) deficit.

    Read more
  • Report Studies Artists' Effect on Neighborhoods

    The New York–based Center for an Urban Future has conducted a neighborhood-by-neighborhood assessment of the potential of arts and culture to stimulate economic growth, writes Robin Pogrebin in the New York Times. The report concludes that artists moving into a neighborhood can drive up rents and force out long-term residential and commercial tenants. The paradox, however, is that arts groups drive up the rents and then cannot afford to remain in the neighborhoods whose rejuvenation they spurred in the first place.

    Read more
  • Munich's New Home for Modern Art

    In September, Munich inaugurated the Pinakothek der Moderne, whose collection spans from Beckmann to Bacon to Beuys. Its curators say it represents a definitive break with the city's relative apathy toward twentieth-century art, writes Desmond Butler in the New York Times.

    Read more
  • International Center of Photography to Establish Triennial

    At a time when photography has become a collecting priority in museums, the International Center of Photography has announced plans to establish the first photography triennial in the United States, writes Carol Vogel in the New York Times. To be held in September, it will present a survey of contemporary international photography with a focus on works by emerging and midcareer artists.

    Read more
  • Museo del Barrio Reconsiders Its Role

    The debate over the long-term vision for New York's Museo del Barrio is about to fall into the lap of Julian Zugazagoitia, 38, the institution's newly appointed director and the first who is not Puerto Rican, writes Mireya Navarro in the New York Times.

    Read more
  • Bay Area Collector Plans to Sell

    San Francisco investment banker Thomas Weisel will put twenty-one works up for auction at Sotheby's, writes Kenneth Baker in the San Francisco Chronicle. Involving major paintings by Willem de Kooning, Arshile Gorky, Franz Kline, David Park, Wayne Thiebaud, and Nathan Oliveira, the sale is expected to bring up to sixty million dollars.

    Read more