News

  • Historic Paris Photos Sold

    Images of street battles in Paris in 1848—thought to be the first examples of photo-reportage—have been sold in London for nearly £200,000.

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  • Duchamp's Urinal on the Block

    One of the most famous of all works of conceptual art, Marcel Duchamp's enamel urinal entitled Fountain, could fetch up to $2.5 million at auction on Monday.

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  • Painting is Back, Again

    The idea that painting is dead is more passé than ever, argues Roberta Smith, citing the prevalence of painting in New York's commercial galleries. Maybe dealers have put their best (selling) feet forward for the annual rite of spring auctions.

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  • Cézanne and Degas Top of the Pack at Auctions

    Sotheby's held a strong sale of Impressionist and modern art on Wednesday night, with a Cézanne still life bringing $16.7 million, a Degas pastel being snapped up for $16.5 million, and a Giacometti bust selling for $13.7 million.

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  • Where's the Money?

    Approximately 130,000 customers cheated in the price-fixing schemes of Sotheby's and Christie's are wondering if they'll ever get back their money.

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  • Selling Andy

    More than any other artist, Andy Warhol blurred the lines between art and commerce. But even the artist would probably be amazed to see the marketing blitz for the “Andy Warhol Retrospective,” which will open May 25 at the Museum of Contemporary Art. For the first time, this museum has teamed up with city government, the Los Angeles Convention and Visitors Bureau, corporate sponsors, and private donors to try to produce a blockbuster.

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  • The New Bauhaus Remembered in Chicago

    László Moholy-Nagy founded the New Bauhaus in Chicago in 1937 to use photography to study light and form. An exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago, “Taken by Design: Photographs From the Institute of Design, 1937–1971,” documents its achievements.

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  • British Museum on the Skids

    With attendance dropping, the British Museum finds itself unsure of the way forward. And with many stepping up to find reasons for its malaise, a cure seems far off.

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  • English Red Room Restored

    Anthony Blunt decked it out in bilious yellow silk, but the Red Room has now been returned to the original state that inspired Britain's greatest artist. Maev Kennedy visits newly restored Petworth, where a major Turner exhibition opens this summer.

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  • Italian Cultural Officials Fail to Spend 65% of Budget

    Cultural officials the world over complain incessantly of underfunding. In Italy the problem is another. A combination of incompetence and red tape has led to the absurd paradox that more money than ever is available for the arts, but 65 percent of the funds allocated to the cultural sphere is not being spent.

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  • Lincoln Center Competition Attracts “Starchitects”

    Sir Norman Foster, Rem Koolhaas, Richard Meier, Arata Isozaki, and Skidmore Owings & Merrill have accepted an invitation to compete for the commission to redesign Lincoln Center's Avery Fisher Hall. The terms of the competition do not specify whether the project involves remodeling the existing building or tearing it down and starting again from scratch.

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  • Liz Larner Takes Home Lucella

    For the second year in a row, a Southern California sculptor has won the Lucelia Artist Award, a $25,000 prize presented annually to an American artist younger than fifty through the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

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