News

  • Robert Hughes Cubed

    Many consider Time art critic Robert Hughes a piece of work. However, Australian artist Danius Kesminas, 35, has turned him into a work of art—a 150-pound cubic yard of crushed metal.

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  • Stand-Off Continues in Italy on Robert Hughes

    Italian undersecretary of culture Vittorio Sgarbi forced the early resignation of the President of the Venice Biennale in order to appoint Robert Hughes curator for 2003 and 2005. Yet he is not having much success convincing the new president, Franco Bernabe. Hughes, who reportedly asked for $700,000 to accept the position, also published a diatribe against Italian politicians in the New York Post.

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  • Going Biennialistic

    With the proliferation of international art exhibitions, people inside and outside the world of contemporary art are wondering what changes they are bringing with them.

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  • Who's in Control of Ground Zero?

    As Ground Zero is slowly transformed from a national symbol into a private construction site, who exactly is in control? Herbert Muschamp surveys the scene. Is the line between public and private interest in the redevelopment of the World Trade Center also an ethical boundary that must be respected?

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  • Unpacking Picasso

    Luckily for museumgoers hungry to see more of his myriad masterpieces spanning a prolifically productive lifetime, Pablo Picasso's artistic legacy is still unexhausted: Nearly thirty years after his death, hitherto unknown groups of works continue to surface.

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  • New Faces at Phillips

    Last week, Bernard Arnault sold the bulk of his stake in Phillips auction house to Simon de Pury & Daniela Luxembourg, who have appointed Louise T. Blouin MacBain as the chief executive.

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  • Vying for the Citigroup Prize

    When Andreas Gursky won the Citigroup Private Bank Prize four years ago, he didn't attend the awards ceremony. This year, with photographers Thomas Ruff, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Elina Brotherus, Shirana Shahbazi, and Roger Ballen all vying for its large financial prize and Agnès B. as its television host, will it finally get the respect it's seeking?

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  • Artangel Brings the Art to You

    In ten years, Artangel has gone from being little more than a name on a closet-size office to the organization that produces some of the best site-specific art in England. Rupert Christiansen talks with its directors, James Lingwood and Michael Morris.

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  • Ofili Thanks His Elephants

    Chris Ofili wanted to do something nice for the elephants who have long supplied an essential element in his art. As it turns out, he has been even nicer to them than he intended.

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  • Sexually Explicit Exhibit Under Fire in England

    A video depicting explicit sex acts has come under fire by local officials in Birmingham, England, who have described it as “repetitive and obtrusive.” It's creator, Mexican artist Santiago Sierra, describes it as a serious work about the Third World sex industry.

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  • Continuity in Architecture

    In his latest article, Herbert Muschamp calls for American architects to learn to reconcile history and change as do the many international architects who have achieved success in the US.

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  • LVMH Sells Its Stake in Phillips

    Bernard Arnault's LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton has sold its controlling stake in the Phillips auction house. Sources claim that Arnault believes the auction business will remain unprofitable for a long time.

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