News Register for our weekly news digest here.

  • Niki de Saint Phalle, 71, Dies

    Niki de Saint Phalle, a Franco-American artist internationally known for her colorful, monumental, cartoonlike sculptures and environments, died on Tuesday in San Diego, California. She was 71.

    Read more
  • Rockwell's Rosie Sells for $4.9 Million

    In all her 78 years, Mary Doyle Keefe had burly arms just once: when Norman Rockwell transformed her into Rosie the Riveter in 1943. The enduring image appeared on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post, giving an iconic face to the millions of American women who powered the U.S. economy during World War II. On Wednesday the work was auctioned off at Sotheby's for $4.9 million, the highest price ever paid at public auction for a Rockwell painting, according to Linda Pero, a curator at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Mass.

    Read more
  • Scottish Artist Callum Innes Takes Jerwood

    Scottish artist Callum Innes has won the £30,000 Jerwood painting prize. The Edinburgh-born painter, who has been compared with Mark Rothko, creates large-scale minimalist and monochromatic paintings. The shortlist included Graham Crowley, Lisa Milroy, Nicky Hoberman, Paul Morrison, and Pamela Golden.

    Read more
  • Niki de Saint Phalle, 71

    Artist and sculptor Niki de Saint Phalle has died in a hospital in San Diego at the age of 71. Her death, after a long illness, was announced by the German city of Hanover, which commissioned some of her most famous sculptures.

    Read more
  • California Arts Budget Gets the Ax

    Echoing budget cuts across the country, California announced a proposal this week that would cut more than half the budget of the state's Arts Council. Several longtime staffers may get the sack, and several programs will end.

    Read more
  • Manchester Art Gallery Reopens

    The Manchester Art Gallery reopens to the public on Saturday after more than four years of building work. The gallery has been almost doubled in size, with the addition of a new extension, and there's a swanky glass atrium connecting the old art gallery to the new. The Guardian's Adrian Searle wonders, though, What lies behind the contemporary obsession with remaking galleries into architectural baubles?

    Read more
  • World Violence on Screen at Cannes Film Fest

    At this year's Cannes International Film Festival, the fifty-fifth, the violence and confusion that afflicts societies from Asia to the Americas have found their way onto the screen. Filmmakers from different backgrounds, working in wildly eclectic styles, use the medium to explore, with varying degrees of success, histories of poverty, war, communal hatred, and the way these histories continue to shadow contemporary daily life.

    Read more
  • Royal Collection Goes on View

    The cream of the Queen's collection of art and royal artifacts, consisting of 450 works acquired over a period of 500 years, was unveiled on Friday, before going on public show in Buckingham Palace's gallery.

    Read more
  • Eyestorm Runs Out of Wind

    Eyestorm.com, an online art gallery that was established to sell exclusive artwork to the Internet masses, has been declared insolvent and is now itself for sale. David A. Ross, who abruptly left his post as director of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and became Eyestorm's chairman last October, confirmed in an e-mail message Thursday that the company, based in London, was being liquidated.

    Read more
  • A Parade of Auction Records

    The contemporary-art market was in a triumphant mood as it danced on the graves of Wall Street, new technology, and the travel business in a flamboyant display of wealth spread across three successive evenings of auctions. Paradoxically, the prices being commanded in the salesrooms are coming to exceed, by a fair margin, what dealers are able to ask and obtain in their galleries, and several notable consignments were supplied by the trade hoping to take advantage of that impulsive bid.

    Read more
  • The World's “Preeminent Garbage Artist”

    Despite many public commissions and exhibitions both in the United States and abroad, the voluble and often funny Mierle Laderman Ukeles remains best known for her singular role as the New York City Department of Sanitation's first and only “artist-in-residence.” She assumed this unsalaried position in the early 1980's, but she actually earned it while doing a conceptual piece called Touch Sanitation, for which she spent eleven months crisscrossing the city day and night to shake hands with every one of its 8,500 sanitation workers, telling each, “Thank you for keeping New York City alive.”

    Read more
  • $1.4 Billion Worth of Stolen Art Destroyed

    For years Stéphane Breitwieser, a youthful-looking Frenchman, traveled through Europe working as a waiter and in his off hours visited out-of-the-way museums where he looked for opportunities to walk off with what he liked. But when he was arrested last November in Switzerland, his mother destroyed $1.4 billion worth of fine art, including works by Brueghel, Watteau, and Lucas Cranach the Elder.

    Read more