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  • Selling Andy

    More than any other artist, Andy Warhol blurred the lines between art and commerce. But even the artist would probably be amazed to see the marketing blitz for the “Andy Warhol Retrospective,” which will open May 25 at the Museum of Contemporary Art. For the first time, this museum has teamed up with city government, the Los Angeles Convention and Visitors Bureau, corporate sponsors, and private donors to try to produce a blockbuster.

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  • The New Bauhaus Remembered in Chicago

    László Moholy-Nagy founded the New Bauhaus in Chicago in 1937 to use photography to study light and form. An exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago, “Taken by Design: Photographs From the Institute of Design, 1937–1971,” documents its achievements.

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  • British Museum on the Skids

    With attendance dropping, the British Museum finds itself unsure of the way forward. And with many stepping up to find reasons for its malaise, a cure seems far off.

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  • English Red Room Restored

    Anthony Blunt decked it out in bilious yellow silk, but the Red Room has now been returned to the original state that inspired Britain's greatest artist. Maev Kennedy visits newly restored Petworth, where a major Turner exhibition opens this summer.

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  • Italian Cultural Officials Fail to Spend 65% of Budget

    Cultural officials the world over complain incessantly of underfunding. In Italy the problem is another. A combination of incompetence and red tape has led to the absurd paradox that more money than ever is available for the arts, but 65 percent of the funds allocated to the cultural sphere is not being spent.

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  • Lincoln Center Competition Attracts “Starchitects”

    Sir Norman Foster, Rem Koolhaas, Richard Meier, Arata Isozaki, and Skidmore Owings & Merrill have accepted an invitation to compete for the commission to redesign Lincoln Center's Avery Fisher Hall. The terms of the competition do not specify whether the project involves remodeling the existing building or tearing it down and starting again from scratch.

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  • Liz Larner Takes Home Lucella

    For the second year in a row, a Southern California sculptor has won the Lucelia Artist Award, a $25,000 prize presented annually to an American artist younger than fifty through the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

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  • Enwezor Speaks about Documenta11

    As ever, Okwui Enwezor enjoys striking an elusive pose. When the artistic director of the upcoming Documenta11 exhibition of contemporary art says anything at all, it sounds sibylline; confronted with questions, he is often dismissive. Right at the beginning of the press conference in Kassel, the exhibition's traditional venue, which had been called for the rather late release of the artists' list before Documenta11 opens on June 8, Enwezor even said: “Actually, I don't have a lot to say.”

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  • The Art of Destruction

    By the time the wrecking ball arrives this month to bash down the signature Spanish tower, all that will remain of the old M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park will be piles of rubble and eighty-three years of memories. Damaged by the 1989 Loma Prieta quake, it will be replaced by a sleek $165 million building designed by the Swiss architectural team Herzog & de Meuron, expected to open in 2005.

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  • New Mood on Eve of Auctions

    On the eve of the Impressionist, modern, and contemporary art auctions, which take place here next week, it is startling how radically the landscape of auction house rivalry has changed. Phillips, having lost its financial backing, has cancelled its spring sale, while Sotheby's, bruised from the conviction of Alfred Taubman, is nevertheless selling three large collections with major Impressionist works. Christie's, too, has found the ground under its feet. Yet with uncertainty in the economy and competition stiffer than ever, many are looking to the spring sales to divine the future of the

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  • Documenta11 Announces its Artists

    Anyone who knows anything about Documenta11 knows that the theme of this year's rendition of the quinquennial blockbuster is globalism. But these days globalism can mean a lot of things, most of which have to do with economic multinationalism and reactionary geopolitical alliances. So what does the term mean to artistic director Okwui Enwezor, and how has he made it the basis for this sprawling, much-hyped, and notoriously Eurocentric art event? The just-released roster of artists in this year's exhibition, which opens in Kassel, Germany, on June 8, provides the beginnings of an answer: In

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  • The British Museum Downsizes

    The British Museum confirmed last night that it will be axing 150 staff—more than 10 percent of its total workforce—in its struggle to cut an impending £5 million deficit.

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