COLUMNS

  • R.H. Quaytman, Portrait of Warren Niesluchowski, Chapter 35, 2019, silkscreen ink, oil, gesso on wood, 20 x 32 1/3".

    Warren Niesluchowski (1946–2019)

    IN EARLY MAY I started to receive emails from friends who were at the professional viewing days for the Venice Biennale. No, they weren’t wondering where I was, why I wasn’t there. They were asking, instead, if I knew anything about the whereabouts of the one person without whom such an event felt incomplete: Did I know if Warren Niesluchowski was coming?

    Warren wouldn’t be making it to Venice this time, I had to tell them. He was in a hospital bed in New York—the latest (and, it would turn out, the last) of the many temporary accommodations he’d had the use of over the past two decades.

    Why so

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  • Lutz Bacher (1943–2019)

    WHEN LUTZ DIED THE WORLD SHRANK. In those ethereal days immediately following her stark exit, magic was the word I heard most to describe her effect. A magical phenomenon requires an effortless delivery, the mysterious sleight of hand where one is made incapable of conjuring the method of transmutation. Magic happens before our eyes, but points to a hidden blindness revealed by the omnipotent magician. Lutz had a way of locating the real in reality—the fact held in abeyance in plain sight. Her sense of where the art resided in the world was as spontaneous and self-assured as it appeared. She

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  • Martin Roth, In July 2015 I shipped debris from the Syrian border to use as bird litter (IV), 2015.

    Martin Roth (1977–2019)

    I FIRST MET MARTIN ROTH five years ago, while he was helping install Pierre Huyghe’s big show at LACMA. Human the dog didn’t have the right papers to work in Hollywood, so we took her for a walk in the canyons of Griffith Park, where she promptly befriended a pug wearing a vest nearly the same shade of fuchsia as the paint on her leg.

    Martin’s work had the gentle, elusive grace of its author. Even in recent years, when his projects had stronger ties to current political events, his approach left more questions than answers. For his show last year at the former Eldridge Street gallery yours mine

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  • BARBARA HAMMER

    OF THE MORE THAN EIGHTY moving-image works that Barbara Hammer created, her 1974 film Dyketactics remains her most iconic. A four-minute paean to lesbian sexuality, Dyketactics publicly announced Hammer’s blossoming sexual identity after the end of her heterosexual marriage and testified to the visionary power of a woman with a movie camera. The film is a revolutionary call for recognition, a how-to guide to sensuality, and a reflection of the utopian spirit that animated a generation of women in search of sexual pleasure and empowerment beyond heterosexuality. It is also one of the most joyful

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  • BARBARA HAMMER

    Sisteresister

    . . . the audacity of fabricating a pre- or ahistoric foundation for one’s contemporary thoughts and actions; the righteousness of claiming truths at the level of the body; the thrill of accessing magical realms hitherto cloaked by rationality and the oppressive world of appearances; and the presumptuousness of going off to live entirely as one chooses, beyond the range and influence of heteropatriarchal media, culture, and ideology. 

    —Greg Youmans

    BARBARA HAMMER’S DEATH was a finale, an ode to a courageous, inspiring, influential, and illustrious life of wonder, achievement, and

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  • Agnès Varda, 2009. Photo: Charles Hopkinson/Camera Press/Redux.

    AGNÈS VARDA

    IN THE SPRING OF 2017, I accompanied two friends on a visit to Agnès Varda’s home on the rue Daguerre, in Paris, where she lived from the early 1950s until her death on March 29 at age ninety. In 1954, Varda mounted her first photography exhibition in the narrow, light-filled courtyard that bisects this house on a street named for the pioneering nineteenth-century French photographer. You may have seen the space in one of her documentaries: Varda seated on a plant-lined stone stairway with a cat nearby, talking to the camera, drawing us into her cinematic world. The house was filled with images

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  • Kazue Kobata. ©️ VOGUE JAPAN.

    Kazue Kobata (1946–2019)

    I FIRST MET KAZUE KOBATA in New York City, in the mid-1970s, with the dancer Min Tanaka, to whom Kazue was a lifelong manager and friend. She asked for my assistance in securing a performance venue that would prevent Min—who was just starting to experiment with naked bisoku movement—from once again being arrested by the NYPD. We three quickly decided that he should dance on the roof of the Clocktower, an important early alternative space that I founded in 1972. This marked the beginning of many happy and challenging years of collaborations and performances for New York audiences as Min became

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  • Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian wearing a Turkoman coat, New York, circa 1990s. Photo: Leonor Caraballo. Courtesy the artist’s family and Haines Gallery.

    Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian (1922–2019)

    MONIR AND I FIRST MET in New York City in the late 1980s, when we discovered we were both born in Qazvin, one of Iran’s most conservative and religious cities, and one that took pride in being the country’s medieval capital from 1555 to 1598 during the Safavid dynasty. I was a struggling young artist newly arrived in New York, while Monir, then in her late sixties, had been active in the city since New York’s golden years of bohemia and had formed close friendships with artists such as Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock, and Frank Stella. As a prominent and celebrated artist, cultural activist,

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  • CAROLEE SCHNEEMANN

    “WE ARE GOING TO WORK TOGETHER,” she would tell me self-assuredly, whenever we met on various occasions. I often ran into her in New York, whether on the streets or at Electronic Arts Intermix, where she was perpetually, or so it seemed, editing the video of her 1964 performance Meat Joy. In the 1990s and 2000s, when I was a young curator beginning to explore experimental cinema and radical art by women, and later during my time as director of the Generali Foundation in Vienna, Carolee Schneemann was always on my mind. My earliest exposure to her work was Fuses, 1964–67, a silent 16-mm film shot

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  • CAROLEE SCHNEEMANN

    I FEEL THAT EVEN a dedicated special issue of Artforum would be insufficient to grapple with the loss of an artist of Carolee’s stature. Despite Kristine Stiles’s proclamation, more than a decade ago, that Carolee represented one of the “great women artists” for whom Linda Nochlin had longed, art history has generally failed to recognize the true breadth of her achievement. As was most clearly revealed to me while working with Sabine Breitwieser on the traveling retrospective “Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting” (2015–18), Carolee’s body of work was as intricately interconnected—recursively

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  • CAROLEE SCHNEEMANN

    CAROLEE SCHNEEMANN WAS SUPER FAB! She made her mark early with her definitive performance pieces of the 1960s and ’70s. Her groundbreaking Interior Scroll detonated art history in 1975; it was first performed at the show “Women Here and Now” in East Hampton, New York. She asked Joan Semmel, who organized the exhibition together with Joyce Kozloff, if she knew which type of glue would work best with vaginal fluid. Joan did not have the answer!

    Carolee’s work was undeniably outspoken and rageful. She gave birth to a literal and psychological scroll—it was a voice from within.

    She was part of the

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  • John Richardson (1924–2019)

    “I’VE SEATED YOU next to John Richardson at dinner—you guys will hit it off.” John and I met in Moscow, June 2008. It was the opening night of the first Garage Museum, and my friend and Garage director, Mollie Dent-Brocklehurst, got us together. John and I talked and danced until morning and remained friends ever since. I liked him immediately. He was an art world legend before we met, but I liked him even more in the flesh.

    John had a life-force that halved his age. He knew everything; art-historical references, contemporary painting, gossip, museum collections, royal connections, people’s

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