Critics’ Picks

 View of "Amy Vogel: Paraperspective,” 2014.

View of "Amy Vogel: Paraperspective,” 2014.

Chicago

Amy Vogel

Cleve Carney Art Gallery
425 Fawell Blvd.
September 4–October 25, 2014


One of the more tired arguments regarding nature is that it is simply our own construction. It’s not. It is a collaboration. “Paraperspective,” a fifteen-year survey of Amy Vogel’s work, which is curated by artist Joseph Grigely, lends credence to this conviction. The exhibition traffics in the interplay between kitsch, art, the paraphernalia of display, and representations of nature. All the work retains an air of potentiality about it—with some pieces still partially wrapped in packing material, while others sit respectfully beneath vitrines (a hallmark of Grigely’s own practice).

Just outside the glass wall of the gallery, Painted Rock (all works 2014), an installation resembling a pigment-spattered Japanese rock garden, extends and confuses tropes of landscape painting by refashioning the medium with artificial objects. This jumble of associations feels at once familiar and strange, and it extends into other moments in the exhibition that compete for the viewer’s attention in a manner that is more gleeful than desperate. For example, Horizontal Storage Rack, a collaborative piece by Grigely and Vogel, is a table-like structure cluttered with a range of objects: nickel-plated animal traps, a mauve swan, and a cast of a tire planter, all arranged in various states of assembly, questioning conventions of contemporary art display. These works are all indicative of what feels—in the end—like a natural collaboration between Vogel and Grigely, one that walks a fine line of being delicately off-balance, making the distinction between kitsch and contemporary art moot.