Critics’ Picks

Electroboutique, 3G International, 2010, fiberglass, duratrans, and electronics, 94 1/2 x 55 x 55".

Electroboutique, 3G International, 2010, fiberglass, duratrans, and electronics, 94 1/2 x 55 x 55".

Moscow

“Futurologia”

Garage Museum of Contemporary Art
Krimsky Val, 9
March 5–May 25, 2010

“Futurologia,” a group exhibition curated by Hervé Mikaeloff, examines the legacy of the twentieth-century avant-garde through the works of fifteen contemporary Russian artists. The show is divided into two different themes. In “Science and Fiction,” the art collective Electroboutique stands out with their 3G International, 2010, a sculpture that blends the shape of an iPhone with Vladimir Tatlin’s 1919 Monument to the Third International, and draws attention to the ways in which art has become a commodity, specifically in opposition to the avant-garde ideals. Quantum of Affect, 2010, by Afrika (Sergei Bugaev), is a cross-shaped temple wherein the revolutionary spirit of Suprematism is recalled in drawings, paintings, documents, and objects.

In the second section of the show, “Change and Permanence,” Ilya Gaponov and Kirill Koteshov’s figurative painting Zero People. Kuzbas, 2010, depicts a group of miners as anonymous heroes, and is reminiscent of socialist realism. Last Judgment, 2010, by the Recycle Group, is a sculpture in the style of Soviet art but shows a consumer society through shopping carts and suitcases. Finally, Sergey Bratkov’s Slogan, 2010, offers an ironic verdict in glowing neon lights: LONG LIVE THE BAD OF TODAY FOR THE GOOD OF TOMORROW. Given the rapidly changing milieu of the contemporary Russian art scene, one wonders whether the historical avant-garde will remain inspirational for the artists of tomorrow.