Critics’ Picks

Kendell Geers, Stripped Bare, 2009, glass, steel, 9' x 5' 6“ x 2' 6”.


“Ruffneck Constructivists”

ICA - Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia
University of Pennsylvania 118 South 36th Street
February 12 - August 17

Leave it to Kara Walker to fuse early-1990s hip-hop with the early-twentieth-century avant-garde in her most recent curatorial effort, “Ruffneck Constructivists.” Walker’s title references the song “Ruffneck” by protofeminist rapper MC Lyte, which affirms the rakish street fixture as one who “goes hard,” unafraid to take action, upending societal strictures in the process. Simultaneously, Walker invokes the Russian Constructivists, suggesting revisions to their modernist legacy. Reimagining the idealism of utilitarian form as social ideology, “Ruffneck Constructivists” recuperates a vitality that too often slips into the crack between modernist transcendence and urban redevelopment. Without explicitly engaging a political agenda, the show articulates a realm of architecture’s intersection with urbanism that is at once radically new and very, very old: the formation of spaces that both repress and are defined by blackness. Aptly exemplified by Kendell Geers’s freestanding sculpture Stripped Bare, 2009—a window delicately cracked by the traces of bullets—the works’ undermining of architecture’s pretensions to stability and security defy the exploitative realities of late-capitalist surveillance, spectacle, and consumption.

Probing the abject forces behind the quantification of personhood, in Claim, 2014, William Pope.L pins 688 fragrant slices of bologna to a wall. Onto each slice is pasted an image of a randomly photographed resident of Philadelphia, and they all together represent 1 percent of the city’s Jewish population. Equally poetic in its mining of material affect, Dineo Seshee Bopape’s art stages fluttering detritus, tiny film projections, and mirrors as a self-reflexive web of remembrance and posterity. While these installations imply the traces of lived presence, Kahlil Joseph’s videos, already beloved by many hip-hop enthusiasts, present urban life as a dreamy entropy, picturing city dwellers as the architects of their own fate. Similarly, Deana Lawson’s Untitled Snapshots, 2013, capture a woman posing with her incarcerated boyfriend and her family—their varying arrangements, clothing, and hairstyles evidencing the passing of time. Lawson taps a spirited refusal of futile social tautologies—one paralleled in the exhibition’s own insistence on troubling who shapes and authorizes urban environments.