Kate Newby

Lulu
Bajio 231, Colonia Roma, Cuauhtemoc
August 2, 2014–October 5, 2014

Kate Newby, I Feel Like a Truck on a Wet Highway (detail), 2014, ceramic, string, dimensions variable. Installation view.

Kate Newby’s latest solo exhibition features a modest and contemplative sculptural installation that playfully exploits the conventions of the physical gallery and extends her ongoing investigation of linking different spaces in nuanced ways. Two components of I feel like a truck on a wet highway, 2014, manifest this idea. The first is a sculpture of bulbous silver bells hanging in the gallery’s entryway. The bells have a precious quality, which is heightened by the artist’s subtle fingerprints on the metal. They are suspended individually by thin, multicolored strings, the other end of which swoops up connecting them to a neighboring roof.

The second is a sculpture of ceramic wind chimes arranged from light to dark—white, creams, blues, then blacks—on a thin, white string in the gallery’s small main space. The pieces are long and narrow, but each is unique in shape and incorporates signs of process, such as air bubbles and fingerprints, while hanging from the same string as the bells. The chimes’ string loops through the bells’ knot before it passes through a door into a private bedroom and out to a patio space. With this gesture, Newby’s work becomes reliant on the walls of the gallery as much as it is dependent on an outside context for its meaning to be legible.

The installation as a single work highlights the mundane and commonplace, and much like works by artists such as Michael Asher and Francis Alÿs, Newby’s work examines where place becomes as much a part of art’s content as objects.

Leslie Moody Castro