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Helmut Newton

Musée de la Photographie Charles Nègre
1 Place Pierre Gautier
February 17, 2017–May 28, 2017

Helmut Newton, Catherine Deneuve, Esquire, Paris, 1976, laser-jet print, 40 1/2 x 28".

The French Riviera is a fitting context in which to exhibit Helmut Newton—few other places effect that particular mix of vulgarity and glamour. The photographer readily embraced this combination, as he was a Côte d’Azur dweller himself (a house near Saint Tropez in 1964, a Monaco residence in 1981). The exhibition provides a sampling of his nudes, fashion photography, and portraits, both silver-gelatin and laser-jet prints, plus a vitrine of Polaroids. Some of the first works presented are masculine portraits shot from the 1990s: from the searing gaze of actor Ralph Fiennes, Vanity Fair, Venice, 1995, to the distinguished profile of industrialist Giovanni Agnelli, Vanity Fair, Turin, 1997. His depictions of famous men—a monocled Karl Lagerfeld, Paris, 1973, or a bespectacled David Bowie, Monaco, 1982—showcase masculinity as debonair, but his portraits of women are explicitly stylized, eroticized, and exhibitionist (or just a whisper away from being so).

Newton’s women are femmes fatales. A model for American Vogue sips wine with one breast hanging out of her spaghetti-strap dress like a louche Greek goddess (Monaco,1996); a different model, shot from above, shares that sculptural quality—her breast is also exposed (Roselyne, Chateau d’Arcangues [Salon], 1975). Voyeurism is a throughline in Newton’s work, especially in Woman Being Filmed, 1980, where an audience gazes fixedly a woman whose top is being unbuttoned by a man. If Newton’s signature is female fetish, he is at least tongue-in-cheek about it, notably in the series of close-cropped profiles for Italian Vogue he titled “Rushmore,” 1982, immortalizing long-lashed, anonymous models.

Sarah Moroz