Critics’ Picks

View of “Apichatpong Weerasethakul: The Serenity of Madness,” 2016.

Chiang Mai

Apichatpong Weerasethakul

MAIIAM CONTEMPORARY ART MUSEUM
122 Moo 7 Tonpao, Sankampheang
July 4 - September 10

Para Site
22/F, 677 King's Road, Quarry Bay Wing Wah Industrial Building
September 17 - November 27

Moving through the dark labyrinthine space of “The Serenity of Madness,” Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s first survey of video installations and short films in his home country of Thailand, which later travels to Para Site in Hong Kong, is like making a nocturnal journey into a primitive cave of delirious unknowns. In other words, it is an experience not dissimilar to indulging in any one of his films.

The selected works span from 1994, when he was a student at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, to 2014. His earliest experimental films are the most revealing. In Like the Relentless Fury of the Pounding Waves (Mae Ya Nang), 1994; 0116643225059, 1994; and Windows, 1999, most of the elements—in both style and substance—associated with Weerasethakul are already established, including structural dualities, play with light and shadow, poetic intensity, mnemonic autobiographical anecdotes, superstitions and local tales. Weerasethakul is arguably one of few leading directors who move effortlessly and successfully between the film and art worlds. His films and installations feed and implement each other symbiotically: Most of his short works are experimental sketches for feature films.

Given Weerasethakul’s nonlinear, dreamlike works one can presume why the thirty-two pieces at the MAIIAM Contemporary Art Museum are presented in nonchronological order and with little contextual information, though these curatorial choices might work less successfully for audiences unfamiliar with his oeuvre. However, for avid followers of the artist-director, this show offers a rare opportunity to perform poetic and political excavations through layers of strangely familiar images, to trace his works from the quiet mystery to the surreal spectacle of the mundane, and to be, as Weerasethakul once said, “suffocated by beautiful memories.”