Critics’ Picks

Richard Mosse, Beaucoups of Blues, North Kivu, Eastern Congo, November 2012, C-print, 72 x 90".

Richard Mosse, Beaucoups of Blues, North Kivu, Eastern Congo, November 2012, C-print, 72 x 90".

Chicago

“Phantoms in the Dirt”

Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP)
600 South Michigan Avenue Columbia College Chicago
July 24–October 5, 2014

Photography is dead, or so “Phantoms in the Dirt” might suggest. After nearly two centuries, photography finds itself in a predicament similar to what it inflicted on painting—questioning its significance in light of changing technology and the escalating reproduction of images that are redefining the ontology of a picture. Photographic practices are foregrounding materiality more than ever in order to stand out from the wash of virtuality surrounding them.

Curated by Karsten Lund, this exhibition features artists whose work remedies this digital overdose. Bark, bronze, rust, and dirt are just some of the photographed and physical materials present here, creating an atmosphere of decay throughout the exhibition. A sculpture by Shane Ward, Barrel, 2014, includes a rusted oil container with a glossy spill of cast-aluminum, which speaks to the similarity between sculptural casting and photographic reproducibility as well as evokes war for natural resources. Upstairs, the viewer encounters two enigmatic C-prints by Shannon Ebner, Untitled, Blank No. 1 and Untitled, Blank No.2, both 2008, of a figure erasing himself from a landscape by holding a white board in front of himself. Harold Mendez’s compelling work Let the Shadows in to Play Their Part, 2012, is an ink-stained eucalyptus bark scrim that occupies an entire wall. In Beaucoups of Blues, North Kivu, Eastern Congo, November, 2012, Richard Mosse uses discontinued Cold War–era camouflage-detecting film to photograph Congolese landscapes haunted by war. Rendering the land an acidic pink inversion of a documentary photograph, this work, in concert with the others, testifies that through a rigorous examination of earthly substances and rerouting of traditional processes, photography may yet render the spirit visible.