Previews

  • Mario Merz, Tavola spirale (Spiral Table), 1982, aluminum, glass, fruit, vegetables, branches, steel, tar paper, beeswax, 10' 11 1/8" × 18' × 18'. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome.

    Mario Merz, Tavola spirale (Spiral Table), 1982, aluminum, glass, fruit, vegetables, branches, steel, tar paper, beeswax, 10' 11 1/8" × 18' × 18'. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome.

    Mario Merz

    Dia:Beacon
    3 Beekman Street
    Opening November 20, 2020

    Curated by Matilde Guidelli-Guidi

    A new long-term installation at Dia:Beacon of work by Mario Merz brings the Italian into conversation with his many international peers in the foundation’s collection, providing a refreshingly transnational picture of Merz’s practice and, by extension, of the artistic discourse of the 1960s and ’70s. Among the new acquisitions and loans the show comprises are Teatro Cavallo (Horse Theater), one of the neon assemblages that inaugurated Merz’s engagement with Arte Povera in 1967, and Tavolo spirale (Spiral Table), 1982, a creative collaboration with his fellow artist and partner, Marisa Merz. While Mario Merz’s iconic forms (igloos, spirals, Fibonacci spirals) have most persistently been viewed through the lens of Italian art, Dia’s exhibition will offer a broader, more complex view of the prolific artist’s social and environmentally sensitive practice.

  • BARRY LE VA

    Dia:Beacon
    3 Beekman Street
    Long-term view

    Curated by Alexis Lowry

    Elegant disasters, Barry Le Va’s dispersals are often referred to as “scatter pieces,” though the term is misleading, given the meticulous planning that precedes them. Made of familiar but unorthodox materials such as felt, flour, broken glass, wooden dowels, ball bearings, and even meat cleavers, these pieces are typically delimited by the extent of a gallery’s walls. A spare, early flour work, Omitted Section of a Section Omitted, 1968–69, gamely butted up against the side of Bruce Nauman’s corridor when it first appeared in the Whitney’s generation-defining exhibition “Anti-Illusion: Procedures/Materials” in 1969. Dia:Beacon’s factory architecture will provide an expansive setting for this overdue survey of Le Va’s pieces from the ’60s, allowing his work to commune with that of many more-celebrated peers and revealing his significant contribution to the development of contemporary sculpture.