Previews

  • Lynn Hershman Leeson, CyberRoberta, 1996, doll, clothing, glasses, webcams, surveillance camera, mirror, telerobotic hardware, programming, approx. 17 3/4 × 17 3/4 × 7 7/8".

    Lynn Hershman Leeson, CyberRoberta, 1996, doll, clothing, glasses, webcams, surveillance camera, mirror, telerobotic hardware, programming, approx. 17 3/4 × 17 3/4 × 7 7/8".

    “Lynn Hershman Leeson: Twisted”

    New Museum
    235 Bowery
    June 30–October 3, 2021

    Curated by Margot Norton

    Roberta Breitmore is coming to town, back at long last after her 1978 exorcism at the hands of her creator and double, San Francisco’s own Lynn Hershman Leeson. This summer, the New Museum will give over its second floor to this OG media artist’s first New York solo exhibition, which will focus on significant projects from across her fifty-year career: “Roberta Breitmore,” 1973–78, an iconic performance of dual identity taken to abject extremes; the wax-cast “Breathing Machine” sculptures, 1965–68; the ersatz genetics lab Infinity Engine, 2014–; and many more pioneering explorations in film, on paper, and in silicon of the always-overlapping zones of ego, technology, surveillance, and power. With every eternal return, Leeson and Breitmore remind us: “Disappearance is a fiction.”

  • Huguette Caland, Bribes de corps (Body Parts), 1973, oil on linen, 59 7/8 x 59 7/8". From the series “Bribes de corps” (Body Parts), 1973–81.

    Huguette Caland, Bribes de corps (Body Parts), 1973, oil on linen, 59 7/8 x 59 7/8". From the series “Bribes de corps” (Body Parts), 1973–81.

    “Huguette Caland: Tête-à-Tête”

    The Drawing Center
    35 Wooster Street
    June 10–September 19, 2021

    Curated by Claire Gilman with Isabella Kapur

    Huguette Caland made her first painting, the boiling monochrome Soleil rouge (Red Sun), in 1964, shortly after the death of her father, Bechara El Khoury, Lebanon’s first post-independence president. Six year later, she left her husband and children in Beirut and moved to Paris, where she began the series “Bribes de corps” (Body Parts), 1973, abstract works replete with tumescences and fleshy mounds suggestive of kissing mouths, entwined limbs, and flopping genitalia. Arriving less than a year after Caland’s death last fall, “Huguette Caland: Tête-à-Tête” marks the artist’s first solo museum show in the United States. The survey will cover fifty years of her paintings and drawings, as well as sculptures, mannequins, and haute couture caftans—designed for Pierre Cardin and emblazoned with insouciant line drawings of boobs, butts, and hirsute pudenda. Caland’s happy hedonism delights in the incorrigible intimacy and relationality of her forms—forever contiguous, cleavaging, dancing cheek-to-cheek.