TABLE OF CONTENTS

PRINT December 1964

The Honest Elusiveness of Jim Dine

ONE HAS NO DIFFICULTY IN LOCATING the area in which the vision of Jim Dine tumbles and spins and disports itself, like some playful dolphin. His haunt is the fluid sea of visual paradoxes and ironies discovered by Johns and Rauschenberg. This means, initially, that Dine has concerned himself with the inclusion of objects into painting, the continued opulence, but devaluation, of material paint, and the effect of words which label representations which he is at pains to undermine. Considering Dine’s origins, one is not surprised to see displacements and disassociations in his art, nor a whole sequence of images which are “real” or metaphorical, and are compared with each other to no apparent purpose except to arrive at a sinister or laughable equilibrium, in which all their functions have been switched. Like Johns in his metaphysical interrogation of the painting as an object having little

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