TABLE OF CONTENTS

PRINT May 1965

architecture

Architecture and the New Vernacular

An idea, now treated by those in the know as highly old-fashioned, is that a distinction should always be made between architecture and buildings. As Gilbert Scott, the great 19th-century English Gothic Revivalist put it, “Architecture consists of the decoration of construction.” While such an assertion would only bring smiles from our current schools of architecture or from our professional architectural journals, this is a distinction which is still almost universally made on a popular level. To most people, that which is thought of as architectural in a typical project house, are shutters, entablatures, diamond-paned windows and the like, all of which have nothing to do with the basic structure. And in a very real sense, people are correct in sensing that such details are a frosting, added to make a rather dull product more appetizing.

While the architectural professional would not make

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