TABLE OF CONTENTS

film

Luis Buñuel, The Exterminating Angel, Robinson Crusoe, Los Olvidados, Viridiana, and Belle de Jour

His glee in life is a movie of raped virgins and fallen saints, conceived by a literary old-world director detached from his actors but infatuated with his cock-eyed primitive cynicism. It’s this combination of detachment and the infatuated-with-bitterness viewpoint, added to a flat-footed technique, that produces the piercingly cold images of The Exterminating Angel.

Buñuel reveals a kinship to other moderns: to Godard (the basic feeling that the audience needs educating, and he is just the one to do it), Bresson (they share an absorbed interest in the peasantry and the role of religion in rural life), and the Renoir of Tony and The Lower Depths (what it is like to be poor). Often he seems to be duplicating Renoir, decades later. The same choked, peeling, dank courtyard through which Louie Jouvet walked in Lower Depths, like a halt-footed, bowlegged, giant rooster, is recreated in Nazarin

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