TABLE OF CONTENTS

film

Loving, Zabriskie Point, Topaz, The Damned, and Au Hasard Balthazar

Despite many good things (the first notable eyes since Per Oscarrson’s in Hunger in Segal’s sodden performance, Eva Marie Saint’s intelligent and tense mimicries emphasizing a hungry, tensed-for-disaster face, the dress shop scene which has a compassionate pessimism but stops before all the material is exploited), Loving at times looks disturbingly like the “two together” cigarette commercials. Actually, the movie is a fifty-fifty movie: it shows a sensitive touch for a man who is a complete mess, whose habits are wrong from the ground up, and, along with a sharply acted wife, creates this pain inside tepidly filmed scenes.

Most hemmed in, domestic, tidy, and not put down hard by parts of the New York press, Loving deals with survival on a middle class level rather than eroticism or affection. Compared with an ingenious scene in Topaz, a silent long shot with a brilliant actor, Roscoe Lee

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