TABLE OF CONTENTS

Raoul Walsh: “He used to be a big shot.”

OFTEN DURING THE HEYDEY of the Zanuck-CohnMayer studio warlords, metaphorical approximations of the studio setup appeared in film after film. In the depression highlife movies—Holiday and Easy Living—the studio is a corpulent rich man’s silvery baroque mansion, the studio employees are a giddy loquacious parasitic family that chews up his wallet. In the Shane-Red River mythic westerns a cattle baron, chairbound Ryker or Tom Dumbson, functions as though he’s running a movie studio by driving men and cattle into broken-willed obedience. Half of the Capra-Sturges library is involved with family-town-legislature made up of two-faced Edward Arnold smoothies or bombastic bosses, notable in Sturges for incompetence and pudgy cheeks, who mislead a population of angling gullible eccentrics. Raoul Walsh is one of the most enigmatic directors to unconsciously play around with this metaphor about the

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