TABLE OF CONTENTS

Roberto Rossellini and Historical Neorealism

ROBERTO ROSSELLINI IS CURRENTLY ENGAGED in a film project of unparalleled ambition, “to trace a good part of the history of human progress, [to) give a cultural orientation, in a general way, to vast masses of the public” (1972).1

Already completed are: The Iron Age (5 hours, 1964); The Rise of Louis XIV (95 minutes, 1967); The Acts of the Apostles (6 hours, 1968); Socrates (2 hours, 1969); Man’s Struggle for Survival (12 hours, 1970); Blaise Pascal (2 hours, 1972); Augustine of Hippo (2 hours, 1972); The Age of the Medici (252 minutes, 1973); Descartes (2 hours, 1974).

In preparation are: The Messiah; Denis Diderot; Niepce and Daguerre; The American Revolution; The Industrial Revolution (12 hours); Science (10 hours).

His project poses a number of questions: What is he really doing? Why is he doing it? How does it all relate to the younger Rossellini, and to Italian neorealism?

These questions

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