TABLE OF CONTENTS

books

Islamic Architecture and Architecture of the Islamic World: Its History and Social Meaning

TWO ARCHITECTURAL BOOKS OF general interest are John D. Hoag, Islamic Architecture, in Pier Luigi Nervi’s big “History of World Architecture” series (Abrams), which appeared last summer, and Architecture of the Islamic World: Its History and Social Meaning (Morrow), edited by George Michell and just out. Here it’s tough to pick one over the other, since there is not as great a polarization between connoisseurship and iconography as the two titles might suggest; Hoag also remains aware, along the way, of historical context. As far as I can tell, he does tend to be more “objective,” in the sense that his brand of architectural history involves an impressively thorough, very specifically monument-based approach, whereas the seven scholars who contribute thematic essays to Michell’s book tend to stress buildings as (deterministic?) functions of society, a whole chapter on “Vernacular Architecture:

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