TABLE OF CONTENTS

STRANGERS IN A STRANGE LAND: TIMOTHY O’SULLIVAN AND HENRY ADAMS

FROM 1867 UNTIL THE end of 1872, Timothy O’Sullivan worked almost exclusively for Clarence King as the photographer attached to “the Geological Explorations of the Fortieth Parallel,” a survey of the Western territories administered by King under a $100,000 appropriation from Congress. O’Sullivan’s only Western expedition not made for King during that period was in 1871, when he accompanied Lt. George Montague Wheeler on a trip across Death Valley and up the Colorado River.

This was unfortunate, for had he been with King that year, O’Sullivan might have had the privilege of meeting Henry Adams, who was at the time the redoubtable editor of The North American Review and holder of the newly created chair in medieval history at Harvard. Adams had been invited to spend a season on the Fortieth Parallel by one of King’s fellow geologists. Thus while O’Sullivan was in southern Colorado, Adams

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