TABLE OF CONTENTS

TWO SIDES OF THE BRAIN: MOLISSA FENLEY’S HEMISPHERES

FOR MANY ARTISTS OF THE ’70s, when the great Return to Painting occurred around 1977 it was as though sacred vows had been broken. Artists who had assumed a common ideology, or at least a simultaneity of languages, turned their backs on one another and on a period of open discourse about media and mediums, withdrawing behind pre-1968 lines. It was as though the art world had been given a new interior, where everyone was once again assigned a specific office, with each frosted glass door marked by profession—“Painter,” “Photographer,” “Sculptor,” “Dancer,” “Musician.” The euphony of voices that had resulted from the earlier open plan became a mere echo in the corridors leading to each closed door, while images from the past seeped into new canvases and reliefs.

The relationship that had developed between choreography and fine arts of the ’70s underwent a monumental shift with the new generation

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