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THE AUTO-REPRESENTATION OF PINA BAUSCH

EVERY TIME HAS ITS FASHIONS, and every cultural period its guiding personalities. In new theater this personality is—and has been for fifteen years now—Pina Bausch. I say “new theater” and not just theater, or dance, or ballet, to designate that theater of movement which looks to the future, floating in an area more vast and open than the traditional. Now, when classifications have lost their meanings, the term “new theater,” vague and yet indicative, seems appropriate to a cultural atmosphere that has broken down boundaries and divisions among disciplines and has either outworn the definition of avant-garde or confined it to other eras. This is the arena of the Living Theater in the ’60s and Robert Wilson in the ’70s—although by mentioning these I do not mean to ignore other, if less representative, examples of this renewal of expressive means. The theater of gesture was succeeded by a

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