TABLE OF CONTENTS

AN INTERVIEW WITH FERNANDO BOTERO

Ingrid Sischy: You are surrounded by the cheers of fans and the virtual silence of American art critics. To some you’re a household name, to others you’re the lone sign of Latin America’s presence in the international arena of art. Your work’s been called a parody of the bourgeoisie, but it’s also been dismissed as a bourgeois parody. There are worlds of different opinions on the subject of your work. At the eye of the storm is your obsession with the full shapes that most of us moderns try to stay away from, even if it’s just through mental abstinence. What about these swollen forms? Why have you chosen them?

Fernando Botero: This formation is not something that just came to my mind one day. It has been built through years of meditation. From the very beginning, I had some kind of inclination toward it, then gradually, through experience and knowledge of art history, I was able to rationalize

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