TABLE OF CONTENTS

GROUND UP

Architects take leave of their senses; Arata Isozaki takes his along.

FORTY YEARS AGO, as the vigor of early Modern architecture was subsiding into the anemia of the International Style, the historian John Summerson offered a diagnosis and a prescription still useful today. The Modern architect, Summerson wrote, has

taken a look at the scene around him and then become obsessed with the importance not of architecture, but of the relation of architecture to other things. . . . He has walked out of himself, rather like a second personality is seen to walk out of the first in a psychological film. He has . . . left the first personality at the drawing board and taken the second (the “live” personality) on a world-tour of contemporary life—scientific research, sociology, psychology, engineering, the arts and a great many other things. Returning to the drawing board he finds the first personality embarrassing and profoundly unattractive. There he stubbornly sits,

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW at the special holiday rate of $45 a year—70% off the newsstand price. You’ll receive the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the October 1985 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.