TABLE OF CONTENTS

THE HISTORY OF X

LIKE MANY PEOPLE OF private means, X had from an early age been interested in the arts. He wrote a few books of criticism; the second, Modernism as a Disease, was closely reasoned and well received. He made for himself a definite if peripheral reputation. He wrote occasionally for the magazines on a new artist who interested him, and he usually wrote from such an original point of view that his point of view was often remembered long after the artist and his or her reputation had passed into limbo.

His interests began to attach themselves to the concept of history. X had thought long and deeply about history. History was always with him. He saw the past move slowly as his life moved in an arc around it. Knowing that the arc of his life was no more than the fraction of a degree, he was struck by the changes thirty years could bring in his view of the past, which now included his spent present.

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