TABLE OF CONTENTS

A PARTNER'S TALE

To the Editor:

For the record, would you please print in large, emphatic and capital letters the following:

“THERE ARE NO STORIES TO ANY OF THE DANCES IN DANCES AT A GATHERING. THERE ARE NO PLOTS AND NO ROLES. THE DANCERS ARE THEMSELVES DANCING WITH EACH OTHER TO THAT MUSIC IN THAT SPACE.”

Thank you very much.

Jerome Robbins

New York, NY
1

WHAT WAS ROBBINS SO worked up about? Well, Dances at a Gathering marked the choreographer’s return to the New York City Ballet in 1969, after a dozen years of brilliant work on Broadway. Now he was not going to make entertainment, he was going to make art, and art was, as we all knew, about formal values. That is why Robbins left Broadway, with its idiotic stories of boys meeting girls, for Balanchine, whose ballets were about dancers meeting music. Robbins told an interviewer that the ballet “started to pour out as if some valve inside me had opened up and

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the Summer 1988 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.