TABLE OF CONTENTS

MEDUSA REDUX: IDA APPLEBROOG AND THE SPACES OF POST-MODERNITY

THE FAVORED IMAGE of the artist in the 19th century was the flaneur. Ambling through the spaces of the “spectacular city . . . open to a class and gender-specific gaze,”1 this voyeur and participant in public entertainments—bars, brothels, racetracks—had access to visual experiences and panoramas off-limits to an unchaperoned respectable woman. There could be no “flâneuse.”2 Informal interior scenes of domestic life were of course not exclusively spaces for women artists. But codes of propriety organized the limits of most women artists’ mobility within the spaces of modernity, both in daily life and in paint. To venture forth into a wider arena, Rosa Bonheur, for example, had to secure a permission de travestissement.3

To flâner—through the city, the picture plane, and art history—remains a necessity, even if the spaces of post-Modernity may differ from those of modernity, even if revisionist

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