TABLE OF CONTENTS

PRINT March 1992

LIFE AFTER HUMANISM

If I think of art, . . . I don’t even think about making something. Sooner or later, I think about being. So, art stays in touch with its origin, being, for me. In that sense, it’s fragile. It’s also the most radical manifestation of the unsaid you can produce, if not actually be—and the most opposite to us. Perhaps you make what you cannot be. It’s emotionally disturbing that people are capable of making art. Criticizing this possibility is the same as criticizing oneself.

—Jochen Gerz, 19861

The Street

Jochen Gerz started in the street, the site of both revolution and repression, where life takes place.

Gerz’s first outdoor action—Attenzione L’Arte Corrompe (Caution—art corrupts, 1968)—was an unsigned warning posted on a white sticker on three public monuments in Florence, that cradle of humanist culture. A condensation of the spirit of ’68, a movement in which Gerz, a resident of Paris,

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