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film

Ridley Scott's Blade Runner

“YOU NEXUS, HAH?” asks the wizened Asian technician at Eyeworld. “I made your eyes.” Roy Batty, the android replicant, purses his lips in ironic amusement: “Well, if only you could see what I’ve seen with your eyes.”

References to eyes abound throughout Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner, not only at Eyeworld. The film’s second shot features a huge disembodied eye, staring unblinkingly at the infernal city spread before it (visible in the pupil as an impossibly clear reflection). Replicants’ eyes reflect with a glowing red when the light hits them right. The replicant-detecting apparatus of a blade runner—an android-hunting cop—focuses on a subject’s eye, magnifying it to gauge empathic response; when a replicant kills, it’s often by violence to the eyes. Memories, human and replicant, are linked to visual images: photographs. “I’ve seen things you people wouldn’t believe,” Batty declares, just

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