TABLE OF CONTENTS

PRINT May 1997

film

Nowhere

IN THE BEGINNING, director Gregg Araki’s reputation was tiny but sterling. His early, so-called no-budget movies Three Bewildered People in the Night (1987) and The Long Weekend (O’ Despair) (1989) were wildly admired for their gentle, depressive tone, seeming smarts, and movingly restrained psychological insight. Few people were making narrative films on the cheap back then, and Araki, a madly ambitious young fellow fascinatingly attuned to the inarticulate speech patterns and confused emotions of his generation, was rightly considered a promising, if blurry talent.

If 1992’s The Living End—a talky, gloomy road movie in which HIV-positive lovers unleash their outsider rage on society à la Thelma and Louise—was Araki’s breakthrough, it also marked a certain gentrification within his work. Where before he had epitomized the sensitive, laconic, mumbly poet of youthful despair, he now seemed

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