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SPIN CYCLE

Trouble Girls

Rock was once guys in all their babeness: adorable bundles of desire, rhythm, and rebellion. Women listened, got sung about, and watched the lucky guys flaunt their, uh, performative powers. Well, times have changed and women are making music and getting famous doing it. And this prominence has led us to look more rigorously at the less visible women who paved the way when being female in rock sucked. Yes, rock is being historicized. But history is always tricky. Because there’s never just one story that explains the world to itself.

But this kind of storying is a relatively newfangled paradigm, especially amid the fickle soundscapes of rock. So it’s particularly pleasing to come upon TROUBLE GIRLS: THE ROLLING STONE BOOK OF WOMEN IN ROCK (Random House), written and edited by women about women. It’s also ironically satisfying that this collection of essays emanates from Rolling Stone, which

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