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architecture

Gordon Matta-Clark

NO ONE WENT TO FOOD FOR THE FOOD. One evening the menu might consist of hard-boiled eggs stuffed with live shrimp. Another night it might be necklaces of boiled meat bones. The cuisine, in other words, was often conceptual. But the sense of community was Four Star.

It was a Romulus and Remus thing, the city as substitute mother for orphans who would create a new city of their own. The founders and patrons of Food—the restaurant at Prince and Wooster opened in September 1971 by Gordon Matta-Clark, Tina Girouard, Suzanne Harris, and Rachel Lew—were orphans of America and its paranoid political climate of the late ’60s and early ’70s. Hardhats. Enemies lists. Nattering nabobs of negativism. “Terror bombing” in Cambodia, Kent State. Above all, perhaps, an overwhelming sense of divisiveness, orchestrated from the White House. A society writer from The Washington Post banned from covering Tricia

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