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Corinne Diserens

Getting to know Dieter Roth during the time he spent in Marseilles was an exceptional experience. A generous man completely invested in his work, his project for the MAC was sustained by daily life, in which nothing short of the memory of the second half of our century accumulates—because his project was truly a “life-work.” He left his native Germany as a child at the height of the war’s “monstrosity.” In keeping with the memory of his experiences, his oeuvre was shaped through an excess of production, where every tiny thing, down to the tiniest bit of decomposing material, is part of the photographic and film record of the artist’s most intimate life.

“Our kind of show ... might be called an essay in civilized entertainment,” he wrote in the exhibition catalogue. “I would call myself an inventor of machines that are meant to entertain (or inspire) feelings (or thoughts) that help to digest

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